Tag Archives: Mutual funds highs and lows

POCKETBOOK: Week ending Dec. 29, 2017

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  • Not every stock makes money

One of the honest-to-goodness realities of investing in stocks is that all stocks don’t make their shareholders money. In fact, every year—including in 2017— there are some winning doozies and some losing doozies.

Louis Navellier, in a recent email, included a listing of companies in which shares lost money and were on his “sell” list in 2017. Some included General Electric, down -43%, AmTrust Financial Services, down 63% and L Brands, down -44%.

Some of the winners on his “buy” list included TSL Education Group, up 150%, Align Technologies, up 146% and Burlington Stores, up 30%.

The way I see it, if your investments were up 10% or more, consider it a profitable year.

Wishing you another lucky year in 2018.

 

  • Market Quick Glance

After a year in which the equity market indices continued to make new highs and new highs and new highs, many investors were smiling all the way to the bank. That said, during the last week of 2017, all four indices followed below lost ground. Not a lot of ground—but all wound up lower than they had at the end of the previous week.

Below are the weekly and 1-year index performance results for four major indices— including the dates each reached new highs—according to CNBC.com based on prices at the close of business on Friday, Dec. 29, 2017.

DJIA +25.08% YTD down from last week’s 25.26%.

  • 1 yr Rtn +24.72% up from last week’s 24.27%

The last new high for the DJIA was reached on December 18, 2017 of 24,876.07.

 

-S&P 500 +19.85% YTD down from last week’s 19.85%.

  • 1yr Rtn +18.87% up from last week’s +18.68%

The S&P 500 reached its latest new high on December 18, 2017 of 2,694.97.

 

-NASDAQ +28.24% YTD down from last week’s +29.29%.

  • 1yr Rtn +27.09% down from last week’s 27.77%

Nasdaq reached its latest new high of 7,003.89 on December 18, 2017.

 

-Russell 2000 +13.14%YTD down from last week’s +13.69%

1yr Rtn +12.64% down from last week’s +13.23%

The Russell 2000 reached its last new all-time high on December 4, 2017 of 1,559.61.

 

-Mutual funds

Although the final year-end numbers for mutual funds has yet to be published, the year-to-date average cumulative total reinvested returns for equity funds that fall under the broad U.S. Diversified Equity Funds heading were still charming.

On the day before the 2017 trading year ended, Thursday, December 28, 2017, the average return was 18.91%, according to Lipper. That’s up from the close on Thursday of the previous week of 18.57%.

Below are the best and worst average returns for the fund types that fall under the Lipper’s four broad equity fund category headings through 12/28/17:

  • U.S. Diversified Equity Funds

-best: Equity Leverage Funds, average +42.86%

-worst: Alternative Equity Market Neutral Funds, -0.06%

 

  • Sector Equity Funds

-best: Global Science/Technology Funds, +44.61%

-worst: Energy MLP Funds, -5.95%

 

  • World Equity Funds

-best: China Region Funds, +43.34%

-worst: Global Equity Income Funds, +17.30

 

  • Mixed Asset Funds

-best: Mixed-Asset Target 2055+Funds,+21.48%

-worst: Alternative Multi-Strategy Funds, +4.80%

Visit www.allaboutfunds.com for more information about how various equity and fixed-income funds have rewarded investors over the short-and long-term, based upon Lipper data. Short-term meaning weekly and monthly performance returns; longer-term includes quarterly, year-to-date, 1-yr, 2-yr, 3-yr and 5-yr returns.

 

  • Market volatility

2017 was a rewarding one for many. It was also a year in which the markets didn’t jump around as much as one might remember.

In fact, according to a recent SeekingAlpha story by Lance Roberts, the DJIA “enjoyed less adversity in 2017 than any other year in history going back over 100 years, (beginning data in 1915).”

Here’s hoping that 2018 is as easy going a year.

Happy New Year!

 

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POCKETBOOK: Week ending Nov. 17, 2017

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Happy Thanksgiving from my family’s table to yours.
  • One more time: We don’t need tax reform

More than anything in the world, the Republican party wants to make sure that they accomplish something during the first 300-and-some days since the President Trump has been in office.

Doing something is a good idea. Tax reform, or whatever it winds up being called, isn’t.

Here’s the main reason why I think that is so: When taxes are cut, somebody or something has to pay in one way or another to cover the government coffer shortfalls the tax cuts create.

Any decrease in monies flowing in will translate into an increase in America’s defecit and could make unwelcomed changes to things such as our Vet’s programs,  Medicare, Medicaid, SNAP and other much needed government funded impacts-people programs.

Plus, while 800-to-1200 bucks a year in savings for the average person amounts to something,  the cuts will more than likely cost middle and lower-income people more than that with respect to their annual  health care costs and deductions allowed on their tax returns depending upon the state in which they live.

And, history has shown that the trickle-down talk of how tax reforms/cuts translate into more jobs and higher wages is just that—talk. The same kind of poppycock talk similar to the election promises Trump made to the coal miners telling them that their coal jobs would be coming back.

Or the Paul Ryan talk about how America has been in a horrible mess ever since the Great Recession began. Someone must not have shown him a chart showing  that GDP growth has been being improving since that recession or one showing  the roaring returns that the stock market has provided investors. Or the one with a snapshot of how corporations already have tons of money on their balance sheets available for spending should they desire to spend it.

If the party in power wants to make a positive impact, why not pass a bill that creates jobs focused on improving our country’s roads, bridges and all around infrastructure? Or one that limits the types and number of guns individuals can own? Or requires background checks for anyone purchasing a gun at a trade show, or online? Or provides health care for all without strings attached?

Those kinds of changes would make a big everyday difference in the lives of most Americans.

Tax cuts not so much.

But no matter how you feel, why call your state Senator’s office today and voice your “yeah” or “nay” on the subject.

 

  • Market Quick Glance

A bit of a downer last week. But if history is any guide, Thanksgiving week is more often than not a good week for stocks in the S&P 500.

According to the fine folks at the Bespoke Investment Group, the S&P 500 has averaged a gain of 0.65% during the four-day Thanksgiving week. “And in years when the S&P is up 10%+ YTD heading into Thanksgiving week (as it is this year), returns during the week are even stronger.”

We shall see….

Below are the weekly and 1-year index performance results for four major indices— including the dates each reached new highs—according to CNBC.com based on prices at the close of business on Friday, November 17, 2017.

DJIA +18.19% YTD down from last week’s 18.52%.

  • 1 yr Rtn +23.56% down from last week’s 24.27%

 

The DJIA most recent all-time high of 23,602.12 was reached on November 7, 2017.

Its previous high of 23,557.06 was reached November 3, 2017. On March 1, the Dow stood at 21,169.11.

 

-S&P 500 +15.19% YTD down from last week’s 15.34%.

  • 1yr Rtn +17.91% down from last week’s +19.31%

The S&P 500 reached its most recent new high on November 7, 2017 of 2,597.02

Its previous high of 2,588.42 was reached on November 3, 2017. On March 1, 2017, that index stood at 2,400.98.

 

-NASDAQ +26.00% YTD up from last week’s +25.66%.

  • 1yr Rtn +27.16% down from last week’s 28.91%

The Nasdaq reached a new all-time high of 6,806.67 on November 16, 2017.

Its previous high of 6,795.52 was reached on November 7, 2017. On April 5, 2017 the index closed at 5,936.39.

 

-Russell 2000 +10.00%YTD up from last week’s +8.71%

1yr Rtn +14.00% down from last week’s +15.04%

The Russell 2000 reached a new all-time high of 1,514.94 on October 5, 2017. On March 1, 2017 this index stood at 1,414,82.

 

-Mutual funds

Moving up a tiny bit.

The year-to-date average cumulative total reinvested return for equity funds falling under the broad U.S. Diversified Equity Funds was +14.34% at the close of business on Thursday, November 16, 2017, according to Lipper. That’s up from the previous week’s return of +14.24%.

  • The highest and lowest average y-t-date returns under the U.S. Diversified Equity Funds heading were:

-Highest: Equity Leverage Funds, +33.72%

-Lowest: Alternative Equity Market Neutral Funds, -0.18%

The average return for funds under this heading was +14.34%.

 

  • The highest and lowest average y-t-date returns under the Sector Equity Funds heading were:

-Highest: Global Science/Technology Funds, +46.84%

-Lowest: Energy MPL Funds, -11.68%

The average return for funds under this heading was +9.76%%.

 

  • The highest and lowest average y-t-date returns under the World Equity Funds heading were:

-Highest: China Region Funds, +43.84%

-Lowest: Global Equity Income Funds, +13.62%

The average return for funds under this heading was 24.72%.

 

  • The highest and lowest average y-t-date returns under the Mixed Asset Funds heading were:

-Highest: Mixed-Asset Target 2055+Funds, +17.54%

-Lowest: Alternative Multi-Strategy Funds, +3.26%

The average return for funds under this heading was 11.28%.

Visit www.allaboutfunds.com for more information about how various equity and fixed-income funds have rewarded investors over the short-and long-term, based upon Lipper data. Short-term meaning weekly and monthly performance returns; longer-term includes quarterly, year-to-date, 1-yr, 2-yr, 3-yr and 5-yr returns.

 

  • What’s up for 2018?

There’s already been lots of speculation going on about how the markets will perform in 2018 and Jack Bogle, founder of Vanguard, is one of them forecasting.

Bogle, who is now retired, is predicting that going forward into the New Year and beyond that the U.S.  market will be a better bet than global markets; average returns on stocks are going to be much lower—as in the 4% annual return area—over the next 10 years; and bond portfolios will increase into the +3% average annual 10-year returns.

More than one experienced talking head agrees.

Wishing you plenty to be thankful for and a happy thanksgiving week.

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