Tag Archives: money

POCKETBOOK Week Ending Feb.22, 2019

 

IMG_6682
The cost of stuff.

 

 

  • Sage advice

When asked about a 10-year investment horizon, Warren Buffett was asked where he’d plop his money—stocks or bonds?

Buffett’s answer, according to CNBC.com was this: “If I had a choice today for a 10-year purchase of a 10-year bond at whatever it is…or buying the S&P 500 and holding it for 10 years, I’d buy the S&P.”

What do you think?

 

  • Fidelity’s 401(k) balances

Having $100,000, or any six-figure sized 401(k), is a common goal for many who are saving for their retirement. And while it’s noble, truth is many of us are going to a seven-figure coffer to cover us for the 20, 30 or more years of retirement.

Fidelity is home to more than 16.2 million 401(k) accounts. I’m guessing, no two of them with the same account balances.

That said and if you’re curious, at the end of September 2018 the average balance in those accounts was $106,500.

But wait there’s more: We all aren’t average and a better look at the numbers is represented by the median size of those retirement accounts. (The median represents the middle between the high and the low balance.)

In that case, the figure changes precipitously resulting in a median figure amounting to tens of thousands of dollars less than the average figure: The median amount at that time was $24,800.

Feeling better?

 

  • Market Quick Glance

Indices up last week….

Below are the weekly and 1-year index performance results for the three major indices—DJIA, S&P 500 and NASDAQ — including the dates each reached new highs. Data is according to CNBC.com and based on prices at the close of business on Friday, Feb.22, 2019.

DJIA 11.59% YTD up from the previous week’s 10.96%.

  • 1 yr. Rtn 4.28% up from the previous week 2.71%

Most recent DJIA a new ALL-TIME CLOSING HIGH was reached on Oct.3, 2018 of 26,951.81. The previous high was reached on Sept. 21, 2018 of 26,796.16.

 

-NASDAQ 13.45% YTD up from last week’s 12.62%

  • 1yr Rtn 4.40% up from last week’s 2.98%

Nasdaq reached a BRAND NEW 52-week CLOSING HIGH on August 30, 2018 of 8,1333.30. The previous high was reached on August 24, 2018 of 7,949.71.

 

-Mutual funds

Funds have enjoyed a big jump up from their  January 10 performance figures.

At the close of business on Thursday, Feb. 21, 2019, the year-to-date total return for the average stock fund under the broad U.S. Diversified Equity Fund heading was 12.62%. That’s nearly 3x higher than the average return of 4.70% registered on Jan. 10, 2019, according to Lipper.

Looking at the fund types with the highest year-to-date gains under the various equity headings shows the following:

-The highest total return under the U.S. Diversified Equity Funds umbrella was Equity Leveraged Funds, 23,76%; the lowest, Dedicated Short Bias Funds, -17.8%.

-The Sector Equity Funds group averaged 11.37%; the highest fund type under that category was Commodity Energy Funds, 17.21%; the lowest Alternative Managed Funds, -1.65%.

-World Equity Funds average 9.51%; the fund type with the highest ytd return was Global Small/Mid-Cap Funds, 12.97%; the lowest India Region Funds, -5.07%.

Visit www.allaboutfunds.com for more information about how various equity and fixed-income funds have rewarded investors over the short-and long-term, based upon Lipper data. Short-term meaning weekly and monthly performance returns; longer-term includes quarterly, year-to-date, 1-yr, 2-yr, 3-yr and 5-yr returns.

 

-30-

 

 

 

 

 

 

POCKETBOOK Week Ending Feb.10, 2019

FullSizeRender(81)

•Tax Cuts.

If you’re expecting a big fat refund check from the IRS this year, don’t hold your breath. Turns out Trump’s big fat tax cuts haven’t turned out to reward  tax payers as generaosly as they have the wealthy and large corporations. But that comes as no surprise if you’ve been a follower of this site.

Basically, tax cuts work best when taxes are high—which makes sense. And the highest max tax rate has been high for corporations, sort of:That said, corporations have always had more ways to reduce their tax bills and reduce the tax rate paid thanks to a number of write-off’s companies can take vs. the puny few available to individuals.

Additionally, all the poppycock the Trump administration spewed about how his 2017 Tax Cut and Jobs Act would put more money into people’s pockets, bring about more jobs and pump up salaries along the way, really hasn’t happened.

Sadly, cutting the corporate tax rates wound up rewarding those very same corporations more than they have individuals. One of the results has been smaller refund checks for individuals as the average tax refund check is down 8 percent this year over last translating into about $170 less, according to the IRS.

To put your best tax foot forward, do yourself a favor and take another look at the number of dependents claimed on your withholding. Changing it could mean less in your take home paychecks but maybe possibly could be more in the size of next year’s refund check.

 

  • Market Quick Glance

Positive strides upward on year-to-date returns for the three indices below and big jumps up on 1-year returns.

Below are the weekly and 1-year index performance results for the three major indices—DJIA, S&P 500 and NASDAQ — including the dates each reached new highs. Data is according to CNBC.com and based on prices at the close of business on Friday, Feb.8, 2019.

DJIA 7.63% YTD up a hair from previous week’s 7.44%.

  • 1 yr. Rtn 5.22% huge jump from the previous week -4.29%

Most recent DJIA a new ALL-TIME CLOSING HIGH was reached on Oct.3, 2018 of 26,951.81. The previous high was reached on Sept. 21, 2018 of 26,796.16.

 

-S&P 500   8.02 % YTD up from last week’s 7.97%

  • 1 yr. Rtn 4.92% hugely improved from last week’s -4.09%

The S&P 500 reached a BRAND NEW CLOSING ALL-TIME HIGH on Sept. 21, 2018 of 2,940.91. The previous closing high was reached on August 29, 2018 of 2,916.50.

 

-NASDAQ 9.99% YTD up a bit from last week’s 9.47%

  • 1yr Rtn 7.69% huge jump up from last week’s -1.65%

Nasdaq reached a BRAND NEW 52-week CLOSING HIGH on August 30, 2018 of 8,1333.30. The previous high was reached on August 24, 2018 of 7,949.71.

 

 

-Mutual funds

Repeat from early January:

Looking up.

At the close of business on Thursday, Jan. 10, 2019, the total return for the average stock fund under the broad U.S. Diversified Equity Fund heading was 4.70%, according to Lipper.

Looking at the fund types with the highest year-to-date gains under the various headings shows the following:

-U.S. Diversified Equity Funds average, 4.70%; highest Equity Leveraged Funds, 11.08%; lowest, Dedicated Short Bias Funds, -8.88%

-Sector Equity Funds average 4.88%; highest Energy MLP Funds, 11.74%; lowest Alternative Managed Funds, -2.20%

-World Equity Funds average 4.07%; highest Latin American Funds, 9.01%; lowest India Region Funds, -1.23%.

Visit www.allaboutfunds.com for more information about how various equity and fixed-income funds have rewarded investors over the short-and long-term, based upon Lipper data. Short-term meaning weekly and monthly performance returns; longer-term includes quarterly, year-to-date, 1-yr, 2-yr, 3-yr and 5-yr returns.

 

  • ETFs

Exchange-traded funds (ETFs) have come a long way over the past 20-some years. Not only have the number of them swelled right along with assets invested in them, advisors are using and suggesting them big time.

Cerulli Associates reports that 14.1% of financial advisors’ clients were allocated to ETFs at the end of 2018 compared with 5.4% in 2009.

With money pouring out of mutual funds the growing trend for ETFs shows no sign of stopping this year.

But buyer beware, ETFs do have their pluses but they also aren’t the appropriate vehicle for everyone. Make sure to do your homework and research what’s in an ETFs portfolio before investing.

 

-30-

POCKETBOOK Week Ending Dec. 15, 2018

 

IMG_6456
Folks  may be spending plenty this holiday season but according to a CNBC All-American Economic Survey our optimism about our economic  future has fallen.

 

  • It’s a Global World of Worry

As money continues to be the value that rules the world, it ought to come as no surprise that when our equity markets are in the tank, so are many of those around the globe. Or visa versa.

“The market tensions we saw during this quarter were not an isolated event,” said Claudio Borio, head of the monetary and economic department at the Bank of International Settlements (BIS). BIS is an umbrella group for the world’s central banks.

Combine the fear of our Fed increasing interest rates, our soaring debt, trade tensions at home and abroad, political worries at home and abroad and it’s no wonder that stocks aren’t performing so hap-hap-happly this holiday season.

 

  • Market Quick Glance

If the total value of your portfolio is positive so far this year, stand up and cheer. Then call your financial advisor, broker or whomever it is that’s managing your money and say thanks.

Below are the weekly and 1-year index performance results for the four major indices—DJIA, S&P 500 and NASDAQ — including the dates each reached new highs. Data is according to CNBC.com and based on prices at the close of business on Friday, Dec. 14, 2018.

DJIA -2.50% YTD down more from the previous week’s -1.34%.

  • 1 yr. Rtn -1.67% way down from the previous week 0.73%

Most recent DJIA a new ALL-TIME CLOSING HIGH was reached on Oct.3, 2018 of 26,951.81. The previous high was reached on Sept. 21, 2018 of 26,796.16.

 

-S&P 500 -2.76% YTD down more from last week’s -1.52%

  • 1 yr. Rtn -1.96%

The S&P 500 reached a BRAND NEW CLOSING ALL-TIME HIGH on Sept. 21, 2018 of 2,940.91. The previous closing high was reached on August 29, 2018 of 2,916.50.

 

-NASDAQ 0.11% YTD down from last week’s 0.95%

  • 1yr Rtn 0.79% way down from last week’s 2.30%

Nasdaq reached a BRAND NEW 52-week CLOSING HIGH on August 30, 2018 of 8,1333.30. The previous high was reached on August 24, 2018 of 7,949.71.

 

 

-Mutual funds

And things keep getting ugly.

The average year-to-date total return for funds that fall under the heading of U.S. Diversified Equity Funds stood at -3.12% at the close of business on Thursday, December 13, 2018, according to Lipper. That’s down considerably from the previous week’s figure of -0.94%.

Of the 25 largest equity funds that Lipper tracks, total returns aren’t much sweeter. Even three of Vanguard’s funds have total returns deep in minus territory.

They include: Vanguard Tot I S: Investors, -12.15%; Vanguard Tot I S: Ins,-12.08; and Vanguard To IS :Adm, -12-13%.

The top two performing funds, y-t-d, among that list of 25 were the Fidelity Contrafund, 2.85% and American Funds Growth: A, 2.08%.

Visit www.allaboutfunds.com for more information about how various equity and fixed-income funds have rewarded investors over the short-and long-term, based upon Lipper data. Short-term meaning weekly and monthly performance returns; longer-term includes quarterly, year-to-date, 1-yr, 2-yr, 3-yr and 5-yr returns.

 

  • Salt in a Wound

So you say you missed a chance to invest in Elon Musk’s Tesla?

Oh well, so did I.

But if either of us had plopped down  $1000 in TSLA eight years ago, in 2010, and had neither of us sold any portion of that investment, on  December 12, 2018, that 1000 bucks would  have turned into $21,000, according to CNBC.

-30-

 

 

POCKETBOOK Week Ending Nov.24, 2018

IMG_8271

  • Historic sense

Here’s something to think about from  Wall Street journalist and author Jonathan Clements’ weekly news blog, HumbleDollar:The View From Here:

“History suggests that, five years from now, share prices will be no lower than they are today , and 10 years from now they’ll be handsomely higher. But at times like this, history can be scant comfort.”

So true, Jonathan.

But let me add to that: When I was in the broker biz, the historic data showed way back then that any risks to investing in equities were equalized after 20 years.

I like Jonathan’s data better.

One final reminder: No one has ever gone broke taking the profits their stocks had rewarded them with.

 

  • Market Quick Glance

P.U.

If you were looking for good news re the performance of the major indices, the one place you could look is at  1-year returns. With the exception of the Russell 2000, all three others have 1-year returns that closed the week in positive territory.

As for the Thanksgiving week historic returns….forgetabout’em. Turkeys every where on Wall Street.

Below are the weekly and 1-year index performance results for the four major indices—DJIA, S&P 500, NASDAQ and the Russell 2000— including the dates each reached new highs. Data is according to CNBC.com and based on prices at the close of business on Friday, Nov. 23, 2018.

DJIA -1.75% YTD back down in minus-land from the previous week’s return of 2.81%.

  • 1 yr Rtn 3.23% way down from the previous week 8.33%

Most recent DJIA a new ALL-TIME CLOSING HIGH was reached on Oct.3, 2018 of 26,951.81. The previous high was reached on Sept. 21, 2018 of 26,796.16.

 

-S&P 500 -1,54% YTD way down and in minus-land from last week’s 2.34%

  • 1 yr. Rtn 1.37% way down from last week’s 6.10%

The S&P 500 reached a BRAND NEW CLOSING ALL-TIME HIGH on Sept. 21, 2018 of 2,940.91. The previous closing high was reached on August 29, 2018 of 2,916.50.

 

-NASDAQ 0.52% YTD way down from last week’s 4.99%

  • 1yr Rtn 1.04% way down from last week’s 6.69%

Nasdaq reached a BRAND NEW 52-week CLOSING HIGH on August 30, 2018 of 8,1333.30. The previous high was reached on August 24, 2018 of 7,949.71.

 

-Russell 2000 -3.05% YTD down more from last week’s -0.52%

  • 1yr Rtn -1.85%3% down into minus-land from last week’s 2.73%

The Russell 2000 reached a BRAND NEW 52-week ALL-TIME HIGH on August 31, 2018 of 1,742.09. The previous high was reached on August 24, 2018 of 1,726.97.

 

-Mutual funds

A Repeat from last week:

Slip sliding away…..

At the close of business on Thursday, Nov. 15, 2018, the average total return for funds that fall under the U.S. Diversified Equity Funds heading was 0.68%—- way down from the previous week’s figure of 3.33%, according to Lipper.

But, compare that to what the average year-to-date return was for World Equity Funds, down in minus-land almost 10% (-9.96% to be exact) and our home grown based equity fund returns don’t look so bad.

Most deeply hit among World Fund types were India Region Funds, -17.97%, China Region Funds, -15.48%, and Pacific Ex-Japan Funds, -14.85%.

And I remember when earlier this year and about this same time last year, talking heads were expecting world funds to way outperform our US markets. Ooops.

Visit www.allaboutfunds.com for more information about how various equity and fixed-income funds have rewarded investors over the short-and long-term, based upon Lipper data. Short-term meaning weekly and monthly performance returns; longer-term includes quarterly, year-to-date, 1-yr, 2-yr, 3-yr and 5-yr returns.

 

  • Warren Buffett likes these dividend-paying stocks

Fans of this old man investor might enjoy learning that Warren Buffett likes dividend- paying stocks—particularly those with respectable dividend yields.

Last week, Investors’ Business Daily, published a piece about five stocks in Buffett’s Berkshire Hathaway’s portfolio. Even though Berkshire Hathaway is down, good guess the prices on some, any or all of these companies may be too but the good news here means their dividend yields could be even sweeter.

The five stocks are:

-Kraft Heinz Stock (KHC), dividend yield 4.8%.

-Store Capital (STOR), dividend yield 4.5%

-General Motors (GM), dividend yield 4.3%

-Teva Pharmaceutical (TEVA), dividend yield 4.3%

-Verizon (VZ), dividend yield 4%.

.-30-

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

POCKETBOOK: Week ending July 14, 2018

Here

img_5147.jpg
And from the recent running of the bulls comes this: a fake bull. Kinda sorta made me wonder about our market.

 

  • Millennial Yikes!

There’s a different world coming if you’re a believer in survey results

According to a recent 2018 Retirement Preparedness Survey commissioned by PGIM Investments, 31% of millennials aren’t saving for retirement at all BECAUSE they don’t see the point in preparing for it. They responded that “anything can happen between now and then.”

Well, that’s true. But, anything– whatever is meant by it– takes money. And heaps of it–particularly during the decades spent in retirement.

Additionally, 62% of those responding said they plan on retiring when they have enough money (wonder where they expect to get it?) and 66% said that they think full-time jobs would be kaput and that 75% of the public would work as freelancers in the future. And one more thing,  that “people will no longer retire comfortably in the future.”

Oh my.

 

  • Market Quick Glance

More ups over the short term, but not so for 1-year return figures.

Below are the weekly and 1-year index performance results for four major indices— including the dates each reached new highs—according to CNBC.com based on prices at the close of business on Friday, July 13, 2018.

DJIA 1.21% YTD back up into positive territory re previous week’s return of –1.06%.

  • 1 yr Rtn 16.08% up from the previous week’s 14.71 %

Most recent DJIA all-time high was reached on January 26, 2018 of 26,616.71. The previous high was reached January 18, 2018 was 26,153.42.

-S&P 500 4.78% YTD up from last week’s 3.22%

  • 1 yr Rtn 14.44% down a hair from last week’s 14.53%

The S&P 500 reached its most recent all-time high on January 26, 2018 of 2,872.87. The previous high was reached on January 19, 2018 of 2810.33.

-NASDAQ 13.36% YTD a jump up from last week’s 11.37%

  • 1yr Rtn 24.73% down from last week’s 26.26%

Nasdaq reached a new 52-week high on July 13, 2018 of 7,843.53. The previous high was reached on June 20, 2018 of 7,806.6.

-Russell 2000 9.87% YTD down from last week’s 10.74%

  • 1yr Rtn 18.34% down from last week’s 20.93%

The Russell 2000 reached a new 52-week high on July 10, 2018 of 1,708.56. The previous high was reached on June 20, 2018 of 1,708.1.

 

-Mutual funds

A repeat.

At the close of business on Thursday, July 5, 2018, the total return performance of the funds under the U.S. Diversified Equity Funds heading had an average return of 4.35%, according to Lipper.

Nonetheless, it’s first still a small cap world as the average cumulative total return for Small-Cap Growth Funds averaged 14.34%.

The category of funds with the closest average y-t-d- return was–surprise surprise–Large Cap  Growth funds at 9.73%.

Double digit y-t-d average returns were also found under the Sector Funds heading with Science & Tech Funds, 12.04%, followed by Global Science/ Tech Funds, 11.64% and then Health/Tech Funds, 10.43%.

Visit www.allaboutfunds.com for more information about how various equity and fixed-income funds have rewarded investors over the short-and long-term, based upon Lipper data. Short-term meaning weekly and monthly performance returns; longer-term includes quarterly, year-to-date, 1-yr, 2-yr, 3-yr and 5-yr returns.

  • The cost of trade wars

So far, estimates are that this just beginning trade war is going to cost households about $60 more bucks a year. Another source estimates that figure to be more than double–$127 per household.

I’m guessing it’s going to be considerably more. Time will tell.

Till then, consider this from the blog of money manager Doug Kass:

“History has proven that one trade tariff begets another and another until you get a full blown trade war. And the consumer seems to always get screwed. Currency wars always lead to trade wars and vice versa and which in turn could lead to hot war. ”

Kass says that trade wars aren’t supposed to be easy.

I’ll add, not cheap either.

-30-

 

 

 

POCKETBOOK: Week ending May 5, 2018

  • FullSizeRender(81)
  • Buffett’s advice

Warren Buffett has some investing advice all of us can learn from—even for those who don’t own any Apple stock—a stock he currently loves.

Three tidbits outlined in a recent CNBC.com story include:

  1. Circle of competence. Basically this means understanding and knowing if the business you are buying is making money and that you feel confident that money-making will be sustainable going forward.
  2. Piece of a business. Buffett was influenced big time by Ben Graham’s classic book “The Intelligent Investor”. Read it.
  3. Margin of safety. Buffett likes value and when looking at purchasing a company  “he wants the value at his entry price to be much lower than his value estimate for the company”. That spread difference is what he calls the “margin of safety”.

Why listen to Buffett’s advice? Guess it’s because from 1965 to 2017, Berkshire Hathaway’s stock’s annual return was 20.9% compared to that of the S&Ps 9.9%.

 

  • Market Quick Glance

The Russell 2000 and NASDAQ were the indices that scored the most on the upside of things last week.

And one more time: It’s been since January when, at that time, new all-time highs were reached on three of the four indices followed below: The DJIA, the S&P 500 and the Russell 2000. NASDAQ hit its last new high in March.

Below are the weekly and 1-year index performance results for four major indices— including the dates each reached new highs—according to CNBC.com based on prices at the close of business on Friday, May 4, 2018.

DJIA -1.85% YTD down more than the previous week’s -1.65%

  • 1 yr Rtn 15.80% down a hair from the previous week’s 15.87%

Most recent DJIA all-time high was reached on January 26, 2018 of 26,616.71. The previous high was reached January 18, 2018 was 26,153.42.

 

-S&P 500 -0.38% YTD down more than last week’s -0.14%

  • 1 yr Rtn 11.46% down from last week’s 11.77%

The S&P 500 reached its most recent all-time high on January 26, 2018 of 2,872.87. The previous high was reached on January 19, 2018 of 2810.33.

 

-NASDAQ 4.44% YTD up from last week’s 3.13%

  • 1yr Rtn 18.67% up from last week’s 17.70%

Nasdaq reached a brand new all-time high on March 13, 2018 of 7,637.27. The previous high was reached on March 9, 2018 of 7,560.81.

 

-Russell 2000 1.96% YTD up from than last week’s 1.35%

  • 1yr Rtn 12.73% up from last week’s 9.82%

The Russell 2000 reached an all-time high on January 24, of 1,615.52. The previous high was reached on January 16, 2018 of 1,604.02.

 

-Mutual funds

The average fund that falls under the broad U.S. Diversified Equity Funds heading had a year-to-date return of -0.53% at the close of business on Thursday, May 3, 2018, according to Lipper. That’s a fall from the previous week’s 0.65% average.

Small-Cap Growth funds ended the week with an average y-t-d return  of 4.10% —down from the previous week’s 6.27%

Then again, Dedicated Short Bias Funds’ averagre returns had improved and were down only -4.25% instead of -5.43% from the previous week.

Visit www.allaboutfunds.com for more information about how various equity and fixed-income funds have rewarded investors over the short-and long-term, based upon Lipper data. Short-term meaning weekly and monthly performance returns; longer-term includes quarterly, year-to-date, 1-yr, 2-yr, 3-yr and 5-yr returns.

 

  • Not running out of money

Well here’s some could be good news for retirees who don’t have $1 million or more bucks saved in their retirement accounts.

According to a Reuters piece by Gail Marks Jarvis, “The myth of outliving your retirement savings”, folks with less than $500,000 in savings on average spend “just about a quarter of it during the first 20 years of retirement.”

That data is from a study by Sudipto Banerjee of the Employee Benefit Research Institute.

Huh. Not sure I believe that but if it’s true, wouldn’t that be nice to know.

 

-30-