Tag Archives: Lipper

POCKETBOOK: Week ending August 11, 2017

FullSizeRender(40)

•August Heat

Every day is a new day on Wall Street, Main Street and Pennsylvania Avenue. What happens from the latter, however, impact all streets across America as well as all of the lives of those residing on them. So, the heat is on.

Re the markets, while we are only half way through the month, if history is any guide the Stock Trader’s Almanac reports that August is the 10th worst performing month for the Dow and 11th worst for the S&P500 and NASDAQ.

On the bright side, historically there have been a few more up August months than there have been down ones: Over the last 67 years, the month has closed up 37 times and 30 down ones for the Dow and S&P.

 

  • Market Quick Glance

Two new highs reached for the DJIA and S&P500 but don’t get too excited—all four indices closed with year-to-date figures —and 1-year returns— lower on Friday than they were on Friday of the previous week (8/4/17).

Something to chew on from the Bespoke Investment Group piece titled, “U.S. Equity Share Continues To Drop” published August 11, 2017: “While President Trump can claim that the stock market has done exceptionally well since he was elected, he’s actually overseen a huge loss in the US’s share of total world stock market cap. When grading a presidency, you could argue that the latter is actuall more important….”

Below are the weekly and 1-year index performance results— including the dates each reached new highs— according to data from CNBC.com. Data is based on prices at the close of business for the week ending on Friday, Aug. 11,  2017.

 

-DJIA + 10.60% YTD down from last week’s +11.79%

  • 1 yr Rtn +17.43% down considerably from last week’s 20.38%
  • The DJIA reached another new all-time high on August 8, 2017 of 22,179.11

(Previous highs since March include: August 4, 2017 of 22,092.81; 21,841.18 on July 28, 2017; July 14, 2017 of 21,681.53; July 3,2017 of 21,562.75; 21,535.03 on June 20, 2017; 21,391.97 reached on June 14, 2017; 21,305.35 on June 9, 2017; 21,225.04 on June 2, 2017; and 21,169.11 on March 1, 2017.)

 

-S&P 500 +9.04% YTD down from last week’s 10.63%

  • 1yr Rtn +11.69% down considerably from last week’s +14.44%

The S&P 500 reached a new all-time high on August 8, 2017 of 2,490.87.

(Previous high of 2,484.04 was reached on July 27, 2017 and 2,477.62 was reached on July 20, 2017. Prior to that date new highs and dates include: 2,463.54 on July 14, 2017; 2453.82 on June 19,2017; 2,446.2 reached on June 9, 2017; 2,440.23 reached on June 2, 2017; 2,418.71 reached on May 25, 2017; 2,405.77 reached on May 16, 2017; 2403.87 on May 9, 2017; 2,400.98 reached on March 1, 2017.)

 

-NASDAQ +16.23% YTD down from last week’s +17.99%

  • 1yr Rtn +19.66% down considerably from last week’s 22.94%

The Nasdaq reached a new all-time high of 6,460.84 on July 27, 2017.

(Previous highss include: July 20, 2017 of 6,398.26; 6,341.7 on June 9, 2017; 6,308.76 on June 2; 6,217.34 reached on May 25; 6,170,16 on May 16; 6,133 on May 9, 2017; 6102.72 on May 2, 2017; 6074.04 on April 28, 2017; and 5,936.39 on April 5, 2017.)

 

-Russell 2000 +1.26% YTD down considerably from last week’s +4.07%

  • 1yr Rtn +11.81% down a lot from last week’s +16.36%

The Russell 2000 reached its latest all-time high on July 25, 2017 of 1,452.09.

(Previous highs include: 1,452.05 on July 21, 2017; 1,433.789 on June 9, 2017; 1,425.7 reached on April 26, 2017 and of 1,414,82 reached on March 1, 2017.)

 

-Mutual funds

Play it again, Sam: The average cumulative total reinvested returns for equity funds on Thursday, August 10, 2017 were again lower  just as they were at the previous week’s close (8/4/17).

At the close of business on Thursday, 8/10/17, the average YTD total return for U.S. Diversified Equity Funds closed at 7.05%. That’s down from the 8.93% average return of the week before; the 9.59% average return of the week before it; and the 9.84% return of the week before that. All according to Lipper.

Interestingly, Large-Cap Growth Funds had an average y-t-d return of +16.87 and not far behind it Equity Leverage Funds, +16.39%. Both of those fund types fall under the broad Diversifeid Equity Funds heading.

It was Global Science/Technology Funds that posted the highest average returns of +25.54%, under the Sector Equity Funds heading and Natural Resources Funds that posted the lowest, -17.53% on average.

And World Equity Funds continue to provide investors with highest average returns, +17.76%. There are 4,516 funds that fall under that heading.

Visit www.allaboutfunds.com for more information about how various equity and fixed-income funds have rewarded investors over the short-and long-term, based upon Lipper data. Short-term meaning weekly and monthly performance returns; longer-term includes quarterly, year-to-date, 1-yr, 2-yr, 3-yr and 5-yr returns.

 

  • Sad

According to the results of a recent three-question survey, published on CNBC.com, respondents don’t know beans about compound interest, inflation and stock market risk. Only 30% answered all three questions correctly.

Here’s the quiz and I sure do hope you’re smarter than the not-so-bright 70%:

Question 1

Suppose you have $100 in a savings account and the interest rate was two percent per year. After five years, how much do you think you would have in the account if you left the money to grow?

  1. More than $102
    B. Exactly $102
    C. Less than $102
    D. I don’t know

The correct answer is A. You’d have $102 after the first year. Over the next four years, interest will grow on that $102, meaning you’ll have more than $102. It’s a phenomenon known as compound interest.

Question 2

Imagine that the interest rate on your savings account was one percent per year and inflation was two percent per year. After one year, how much would you be able to buy with the money in this account?

  1. More than today
    B. Exactly the same as today
    C. Less than today
    D. I don’t know

The correct answer is C: less than today.

Question 3

Do you think the following statement is true or false: Buying a single company stock usually provides a safer return than a stock mutual fund.

The answer is false.

(Source: https://www.cnbc.com/2017/08/11/most-americans-cant-answer-these-basic-money-questions.html)

 

-30-

 

 

 

 

POCKETBOOK: Week ending August 4, 2017

IMG_0204

•2,209. Can you handle it?

Lovers of the DJIA gotta be thrilled with the new highs this index continues to reach. But while no one knows how long that index will keep breaking records and reaching new highs, one thing everybody knows is that indices rise and fall over time. Even the DJIA.

So let’s bring a little pencil-to-paper reality into the world to prepare investors for what a 10% drop in the DJIA at its closing level on Friday, August 4, 2017 would translate to.

And that answer would be: A fall of 2,209 points bringing the Dow to roughly the 20,000 level.

Funny how a 2200 fall sounds like a lot, but 20,000 not quite so much.

That aside, take that drop figure up a notch to 20% and the DJIA would fall 4400 points.

Here’s hoping you, your mind and your portfolio are prepared to handle a fall of 10% or more because drops happen. How big a fall and for how long is the big unknown.

 

  • Market Quick Glance

The DJIA continued to reach a high new high level  at  week’s end. The same wasn’t true for the rest of the crew.

Below are the weekly and 1-year index performance results— including the dates each reached new highs— according to data from CNBC.com. Data is based on prices at the close of business for the week ending on Friday, Aug. 4, 2017.

-DJIA + 11.79% YTD up from last week’s +10.46%

  • 1 yr Rtn +20.38% up from last week’s 18.28%

The DJIA reached another new all-time high on August 4, 2017 of 22,092.81.

(Previous highs since March include: 21,841.18 on July 28, 2017; July 14, 2017 of 21,681.53; July 3,2017 of 21,562.75; 21,535.03 on June 20, 2017; 21,391.97 reached on June 14, 2017; 21,305.35 on June 9, 2017; 21,225.04 on June 2, 2017; and 21,169.11 on March 1, 2017.)

 

-S&P 500 +10.63% YTD up a bit from last week’s 10.42%

  • 1yr Rtn +14.44% up from last week’s +13.92%

The S&P 500 reached a new all-time high on July 27, 2017 of 2,484.04.

(Previous high of 2,477.62 was reached on July 20, 2017. Prior to that date new highs and dates include: 2,463.54 on July 14, 2017; 2453.82 on June 19,2017; 2,446.2 reached on June 9, 2017; 2,440.23 reached on June 2, 2017; 2,418.71 reached on May 25, 2017; 2,405.77 reached on May 16, 2017; 2403.87 on May 9, 2017; 2,400.98 reached on March 1, 2017.)

 

-NASDAQ +17.99% YTD down from last week’s +18.42%

  • 1yr Rtn +22.94% down from last week’s 23.66%

The Nasdaq reached a new all-time high of 6,460.84 on July 27, 2017.

(Previous highss include: July 20, 2017 of 6,398.26; 6,341.7 on June 9, 2017; 6,308.76 on June 2; 6,217.34 reached on May 25; 6,170,16 on May 16; 6,133 on May 9, 2017; 6102.72 on May 2, 2017; 6074.04 on April 28, 2017; and 5,936.39 on April 5, 2017.)

 

-Russell 2000 +4.07% YTD down from last week’s +5.31%

  • 1yr Rtn +16.36% down from last week’s +17.41%

The Russell 2000 reached its latest all-time high on July 25, 2017 of 1,452.09.

(Previous highs include: 1,452.05 on July 21, 2017; 1,433.789 on June 9, 2017; 1,425.7 reached on April 26, 2017 and of 1,414,82 reached on March 1, 2017.)

 

-Mutual funds

Average YTD returns? Once again, less than those of the previous week.

At the close of business on Thursday, Aug. 3, 2017, the average YTD total return for U.S. Diversified Equity Funds closed at 8.93%. That’s down from the 9.59% average return of the week before, according to Lipper. And that was down from the week previous to it of 9.84%.

Mixed Asset Funds invest in both stocks and bonds—hence the name “mixed”. Under that broad heading that included 5,915 funds, the average year-to-date return was 8.37%.

The biggest winners in that group were Mixed-Asset Target Funds—-particularly those with the longest maturity dates. The winner here was Mixed-Asset Target 2055+ Funds, 12.67%.

Others with strong year-to-date average returns include: Mixed-Asset Target 2045 Funds had average returns of 12.35%; Mixed-Asset Target 2050 Funds at 12.19%, Mixed-Asset Target 2040 Funds, 11.64% and Mixed-Asset Target 2015 Funds 11.34%.

The poorest returns under the Mixed-Asset heading were found in Alternative Multi-Strategy Funds, 2.30% and Absolute Returns Funds, 3.08%.

Visit www.allaboutfunds.com for more information about how various equity and fixed-income funds have rewarded investors over the short-and long-term, based upon Lipper data. Short-term meaning weekly and monthly performance returns; longer-term includes quarterly, year-to-date, 1-yr, 2-yr, 3-yr and 5-yr returns.

 

  • Gas highs

Just about the time I got used seeing gas prices hovering around the $2 a gallon level, prices jumped up. Rats!

But things could be worse.

According to AAA, $2.35 was the average price for a gallon of regular unleaded gas around the country last week. One month ago it was 2.24 and one year ago it was 2.13.

Here’s the “worse” part: The highest price on record for a gallon of reg. unleaded was $4.12 reached in July 2008.

Guess 2.35 isn’t so bad after all.

 

POCKETBOOK: Week ending July 28, 2017

  • FullSizeRender(31)
  • Fewer choices

Equity prices and market indices continued their tear. One reason? Could be because there are fewer stocks to choose from.

According to data from the University of Chicago’s Center for Research in Security Prices (CRSP) the number of stocks is at its lowest level in decades. In November of 1997, for instance, there were  7,355 U.S. stocks and now there are fewer than 3,500.

That’s a huge drop. Huge.

Also on the slide are the number of initial public offerings, IPOs, while the appetite for investing in the private market is growing.

That aside, in today’s high-rising market environment, investors ought not forget to remember –re the higher prices—  that what happens when a serious desire for equities mixes with a bounty of money and fewer publicly traded companies to choose from is  prices go up.

And that’s how bid/ask auction marketplaces work.

 

  • Market Quick Glance

As equity prices continued to rise, they brought with them new index highs. The DJIA, for instance, reached a new high when the market closed on Friday, the S&P 500 and NASDAQ hit there’s on Thursday and the Russell 2000 on Monday.

So much for consistency.

Speaking of which, if there is one consistent thing this bull has shown investors is that this time it really is different. And quite likely, the sooner everyone decides to believe that, the sooner the bears will probably begin to roar.

Below are the weekly and 1-year index performance results— including the dates each reached new highs— according to data from CNBC.com. Data is based on prices at the close of business for the week ending on Friday, July 28,   2017.

-DJIA + 10.46% YTD up from last week’s +9.20%

  • 1 yr Rtn +18.28% up from last week’s 16.54%

The DJIA reached a new all-time high of 21,841.18 on July 28, 2017.

(Previous highs include: July 14, 2017 of 21,681.53; July 3,2017 of 21,562.75; 21,535.03 on June 20, 2017; 21,391.97 reached on June 14, 2017; 21,305.35 on June 9, 2017; 21,225.04 on June 2, 2017; and 21,169.11 on March 1, 2017.)

 

-S&P 500 +10.42% YTD down a hair from last week’s 10.44%

  • 1yr Rtn +13.92% down from last week’s +14.20%

The S&P 500 reached a new all-time high on July 27, 2017 of 2,484.04.

(Previous high of 2,477.62 was reached on July 20, 2017. Prior to that date new highs and dates include: 2,463.54 on July 14, 2017; 2453.82 on June 19,2017; 2,446.2 reached on June 9, 2017; 2,440.23 reached on June 2, 2017; 2,418.71 reached on May 25, 2017; 2,405.77 reached on May 16, 2017; 2403.87 on May 9, 2017; 2,400.98 reached on March 1, 2017.)

 

-NASDAQ +18.42% YTD down from last week’s +18.66%

  • 1yr Rtn +23.66% down from last week’s 25.89%

The Nasdaq reached a new all-time high of 6,460.84 on July 27, 2017.

(Previous highss include: July 20, 2017 of 6,398.26; 6,341.7 on June 9, 2017; 6,308.76 on June 2; 6,217.34 reached on May 25; 6,170,16 on May 16; 6,133 on May 9, 2017; 6102.72 on May 2, 2017; 6074.04 on April 28, 2017; and 5,936.39 on April 5, 2017.)

 

-Russell 2000 +5.31% YTD down from last week’s +5.80%

  • 1yr Rtn +17.41% down from last week’s +19.27%

The Russell 2000 reached its latest all-time high on July 25, 2017 of 1,452.09.

(Previous highs include: 1,452.05 on July 21, 2017; 1,433.789 on June 9, 2017; 1,425.7 reached on April 26, 2017 and of 1,414,82 reached on March 1, 2017.)

 

-Mutual funds

Average returns? Less than the week before.

The average U.S. Diversified Equity Fund lost a little ground last week closing at 9.59% at the close of business on Thursday, July 27, 2017, according to Lipper. That’s down from the previous week’s close of 9.84%.

If you’ve still only been thinking U.S. equities, one thing this year has shown investors is that better investment returns can be found in other places around the globe.

For instance, the average y-t-d return of the 4,516 funds that fall under the World Equity Funds heading,is 19.35%. That about 10% higher than what the average diversified equity fund has returned.

Yes, India Region Funds still rule—up on average 32.03%.

Of course the big question is how long will world funds continue to outperform U.S. ones. And the answer is: as long as other countries’ econonmies grow faster than ours.

Visit www.allaboutfunds.com for more information about how various equity and fixed-income funds have rewarded investors over the short-and long-term, based upon Lipper data. Short-term meaning weekly and monthly performance returns; longer-term includes quarterly, year-to-date, 1-yr, 2-yr, 3-yr and 5-yr returns.

 

  • Happy Birthday Medicare & Medicaid

In case you missed it, it was on July 30, 1965 that President Lyndon B. Johnson signed Medicare into law. He also signed Medicaid into law that same day. Both amendments to the Social Security Act.

Here’s more about that  history from History.com: “At the bill-signing ceremony, which took place at the Truman Library in Independence, Missouri, former President Harry S. Truman was enrolled as Medicare’s first beneficiary and received the first Medicare card. Johnson wanted to recognize Truman, who, in 1945,had become the first president to propose national health insurance, an initiative that was opposed at the time by Congress.

“The Medicare program, providing hospital and medical insurance for Americans age 65 or older, was signed into law as an amendment to the Social Security Act of 1935. Some 19 million people enrolled in Medicare when it went into effect in 1966. In 1972, eligibility for the program was extended to Americans under 65 with certain disabilities and people of all ages with permanent kidney disease requiring dialysis or transplant. In December 2003, President George W. Bush signed into law the Medicare Modernization Act (MMA), which added outpatient prescription drug benefits to Medicare.

“Medicare is funded entirely by the federal government and paid for in part through payroll taxes. Medicare is currently a source of controversy due to the enormous strain it puts on the federal budget. Throughout its history, the program also has been plagued by fraud–committed by patients, doctors and hospitals–that has cost taxpayers billions of dollars.

“In 1977, the Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA) was created to administer Medicare and work with state governments to administer Medicaid. HCFA, which was later renamed the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), is part of the Department of Health and Human Services and is headquartered in Baltimore…”

 

-30-

 

 

POCKETBOOK: Week ending July 14, 2017

  • FullSizeRender(31)

  • Middle class illusion

 If you’re at all like 70 percent of America’s adult population, you consider yourself middle class both in income and mindset. This, according to the results from Northwestern Mutual’s 2017 Planning and Progress study.

Too bad that’s not really the case.

Turns out the middle class has lost a serious amount of its heft over the past 45-ish years. According to Pew Research Center, in 1971, middle-income households totaled 61 percent of the household landscape. But by 2015, that percentage had slid to 50 percent.

While the middle class is shrinking, both the number of households in the upper- and lower-income levels has been on the rise.

So much for that 70 percent thinking.

 

  • Market Quick Glance

I get nervous when all the 30-some stocks that I follow close in the green. But, that’s what happened as of the close of market business Friday.

As for the four indices followed here, all four had a great week with year-to-date numbers higher than the week previous. Additionally, both the DJIA and S&P 500 reached new highs for the year.

That’s all hunky dorey but take notice of the 1-year returns and you will see that all four indices figures are lower than they were a week ago.

So, as Friends character Joey Tribbiani would say, “How YOU doin?”

And if you’re doin good, maybe it’s time to lock in some profits. Nobody has ever gone  broke doin that.

Below are the weekly and 1-year index performance results— including the dates each reached new highs— according to data from CNBC.com. Data is based on prices at the close of business for the week ending on Friday, July 14, 2017.

-DJIA + 9.49% YTD up handsomely from last week’s +8.36%

  • 1 yr Rtn +16.92% down from last week’s 19.66%

The DJIA reached a new all-time high on July 14, 2017 of 21,681.53.

(Previous high was on July 3,2017 of 21,562.75. Prior to that high dates include: 21,535.03 on June 20, 2017; 21,391.97 reached on June 14, 2017; 21,305.35 on June 9, 2017; 21,225.04 on June 2, 2017; and 21,169.11 on March 1, 2017.)

 

-S&P 500 +9.85% YTD up attractively from last week’s 8.32%

  • 1yr Rtn +13.66% down from last week’s +15.60%

The S&P 500 reached a new all-time high of 2,463.54 on July 14, 2017.

(Prior to that date new highs and dates include: 2,453.82 on June 19,2017; 2,446.2 reached on June 9, 2017; 2,440.23 reached on June 2, 2017; 2,418.71 reached on May 25, 2017; 2,405.77 reached on May 16, 2017; 2403.87 on May 9, 2017; 2,400.98 reached on March 1, 2017.)

 

-NASDAQ +17.26% YTD up seriously from last week’s +14.30%

  • 1yr Rtn +25.40% down from last week’s 26.17%

The Nasdaq reached a new all-time high of 6,341.7 on June 9, 2017.

(Previous highs include: 6,308.76 on June 2; 6,217.34 reached on May 25; 6,170,16 on May 16; 6,133 on May 9, 2017; 6102.72 on May 2, 2017; 6074.04 on April 28, 2017; and 5,936.39 on April 5, 2017.)

 

-Russell 2000 +5.28% YTD up enough to notice from last week’s +4.33%

  • 1yr Rtn +18.85% down seriously from last week’s +23.14%

The Russell 2000 reached its latest all-time high of 1,433.789 on June 9, 2017. (Previous highs include 1,425.7 reached on April 26, 2017 and of 1,414,82 reached on March 1, 2017.)

-Mutual funds

Like the major indices showed their stuff, last week the average U.S. Diversified Equity Fund gained ground too closing at 8.74% at the close of business on Thursday, July 13, 2017, according to Lipper. That’s up attractively from the previous week’s close of 6.95%.

That said, time is one of the most important factors to consider before dipping your toe into the ever-changing currents of the stock market. And just like every other thing associated with investing, there is no one guaranteed time frame that comes with the promise of making you money. All time frames can be rewarding or disappointing. That’s just the nature of this beast.

To make that point, here’s a relatively short-term look at the cumulative total reinvestment performance for the 8,549 funds that fall under the U.S. Diversified Equity Funds over seven time periods:

-1 week: up 1.62% (7/6/17 through 7/13/17)

-4 weeks: up 1.01% (6/15/17 through 7/13/17)

-13 weeks: up 5.50% (4/13/17  through /13/17)

-52 weeks: up 14.88% (7/14/16 through 7/13/17)

-2 years: up 7.47% (7/9/15 through 7/13/17)

-3 years: up 6.64% (7/10/14 through 7/13/17)

-5 years: up 12.65% (7/12/12 through 7/13/17)

Visit www.allaboutfunds.com for more information about how various equity and fixed-income funds have rewarded investors over the short-and long-term, based upon Lipper data. Short-term meaning weekly and monthly performance returns; longer-term includes quarterly, year-to-date, 1-yr, 2-yr, 3-yr and 5-yr returns.

 

  • IPOs? Not so fast

Louis Navellier is no fan of investing in IPOs.

According to his recent Navellier Growth Fund newsletter, this well-established money manager pointed out that over 70 companies have already gone public so far this year. But, while that’s exciting news for some, Navellier warns everyday ordinary investors to stay away from these big-time hyped and often temping offers.

“The last thing you should do is buy into the hype,” he said. The reason? Because he said there is “ too much volatility early on.”

Instead, he suggests waiting. “If you want to get into these companies, I recommend that you come back in a year or two….And I say that for one specific reason—-earnings results.”

 

-30-

 

 

POCKETBOOK: Week ending July 7, 2017

  • OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

•Losing money in the market?

There has never been any honest-to-God guarantees that come once you decide to invest some of your money into the stock markets. And there never will be.

That’s because, in the broadest sense, as stocks trade hands during every trading day of the year profits and loses are chalked up in all individual and professional account ledgers.

With that reality in mind, Barbara Friedberg penned a piece titled “Why People Lose Money in the Market” that appeared at TheBalance.com recently.

According to this former portfolio manager turned author, the three reasons people lose money are:

-Because they don’t understand economic and investment cycles.

-Because they let their emotions drive their investing.

-And because they think investing is a get-rich-quick scheme.

Got that?

 

  • Market Quick Glance

The major indices closed up during the past week. And that’s the good news.

What’s the bad? Who knows. The bull that has been running wild on Wall Street for the last eight years seems to be some kind of  anchored. And until the future provides us with a look at the past, we won’t know for sure what does this bully in.

Below are the weekly and 1-year index performance results— including the dates each has reached  new highs. All  this according to data from CNBC.com. and based  upon market results at the close of business for the week ending on Friday, July 7,   2017.

-DJIA + 8.36% YTD up from last week’s +8.03%

  • 1 yr Rtn +19.66% up from last week’s 19.07%

The DJIA reached a new all-time high on July 3,2017 of 21,562.75.

(Previous highs include 21,535.03 on June 20, 2017; 21,391.97 reached on June 14, 2017; 21,305.35 on June 9, 2017; 21,225.04 on June 2, 2017; and 21,169.11 on March 1, 2017.)

 

-S&P 500 +8.32% YTD up from last week’s 8.24%

  • 1yr Rtn +15.60% up from last week’s +15.46%

The S&P 500 reached a new all-time high of 2,453.82 on June 19,2017.

(The previous high of 2,446.2 was reached on June 9, 2017. Before that 2,440.23 was reached on June 2, 2017; 2,418.71 reached on May 25, 2017; 2,405.77 reached on May 16, 2017; 2403.87 on May 9, 2017; 2,400.98 reached on March 1, 2017.)

 

-NASDAQ +14.307% YTD up from last week’s +14.07%

  • 1yr Rtn +26.17% down from last week’s 26.80%

The Nasdaq reached a new all-time high of 6,341.7 on June 9, 2017.

(Previous highs include: 6,308.76 on June 2; 6,217.34 reached on May 25; 6,170,16 on May 16; 6,133 on May 9, 2017; 6102.72 on May 2, 2017; 6074.04 on April 28, 2017; and 5,936.39 on April 5, 2017.)

 

-Russell 2000 +4.33% YTD up from last week’s +4.29%

  • 1yr Rtn +23.14% up from last week’s +22.87%

The Russell 2000 reached its latest all-time high of 1,433.789 on June 9, 2017.

(Previous highs include 1,425.7 reached on April 26, 2017 and of 1,414,82 reached on March 1, 2017.)

 

-Mutual funds

Equity funds lost ground last week as, at the close of business on Thursday, July 6, 2017, the year-to-date total return for the average U.S. Diversified Equity Funds stood at 6.95%. That’s down from the previous week’s close of 7.52%.

Looking back over the last 52 weeks (7/7/16 thru 7/6/17), the three fund types under this broad heading that have rewarded their shareholders the most include: Equity Leverage Funds +33.39%; Small-Cap Value Fund, ++21.06%; Small-Cap Growth Funds, +20.87%.

The three fund types experiencing the poorest returns over that same time period were: Dedicated Short-Bias Funds, -23.22%; Alternative Equity Market Neutral Funds, +0.90%; and Specialty Diversified Equity Funds, +4.30%.

Visit www.allaboutfunds.com for more information about how various equity and fixed-income funds have rewarded investors over the short-and long-term, based upon Lipper data. Short-term meaning weekly and monthly performance returns; longer-term includes quarterly, year-to-date, 1-yr, 2-yr, 3-yr and 5-yr returns.

 

  • Got stocks?

The market has been roaring this year but that doesn’t mean everyone has participated in the bounty. In fact, according to a 2016 Gallup Poll, just over half (52%) of American adults say that they had money invested in the stock market.

That’s down from a high of 65% in 2007.

It  ought to come as no surprise that those who make up the middle-class and who were in the market prior to the crash of 2007 have stayed away from it in recent years.

On another kinda sorta related subject, the American Bankers Association Consumer Credit Delinquency Bulletin has reported that in the first quarter of 2017 there was an increase in late payments for car, truck, home equity and credit card loans/debts.

Guess if you don’t have enough cash to meet your monthly expenses/commitments it’s not likely that you’ll have enough to invest in the market.

-30-

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

POCKETBOOK: Week ending June 30, 2017

Money

  • 4th of July and the S&P 500.

It’s a holiday week with the markets enjoying limited hours and closed all day on Tuesday for Independence Day.

For those curious about how the S&P 500 has performed since 1990 during previous 4th of July weeks, the fine folks at The Bespoke Group have done some looking back to inform us.

Although Bespoke’s data shows returns for every week day of the year since 1990, I’m showing only the returns in the years in which the 4th fell on a Tuesday. Previous to this one, there are three of them.

The 4th’s weekly returns were based on closing prices on the Friday before the week of the 4th and ending at the end of the holiday week are as follows. Below are the 4th falling on Tuesday figures:

-In 1995, the return for the first half of the year for the S&P 500 was up 18.61%. And, at the end of the week in which the 4th fell, it was up 2.13%.

-In 2000, the S&P 500 was down 1% at the end of the first half of the year. The return for the July 4th week was up 1.67%.

-In 2006, the first half return was up 1.76%. At the end of the July 4th week the S&P was down 0.37%.

-This year, 2017, the S&P 500 was up 8.27% at mid-year.

How it ends the 4th of July week is anybody’s guess.

  

  • Market Quick Glance

The only index that experienced a plus week from their previous week’s close was the Russell 2000. The other three saw year-to-date returns slide with NASDAQ’s falling the most. Nontheless, for many index investors, 2017 has been a rewarding year.

Below are the weekly and 1-year index performance results— including the dates each reached new highs— according to data from CNBC.com. Data is based on prices at the close of business for the week ending on Friday, June 30, 2017.

-DJIA + 8.03% YTD down from last week’s +8.26%

  • 1 yr Rtn +19.07% up from last week’s 18.79%

The DJIA reached a new all-time high of 21,535.03 on June 20, 2017. (Previous high of 21,391.97 reached on June 14, 2017; before it 21,305.35 on June 9, 2017; 21,225.04 on June 2, 2017; and 21,169.11 on March 1, 2017.)

 

-S&P 500 +8.24% YTD down a hair from last week’s 8.91%

  • 1yr Rtn +15.46% up a chuck from last week’s +15.38%

The S&P 500 reached a new all-time high of 2,453.82 on June 19,2017. (Previous high of 2,446.2 was reached on June 9, 2017. Before that 2,440.23 was reached on June 2, 2017; 2,418.71 reached on May 25, 2017; 2,405.77 reached on May 16, 2017; 2403.87 on May 9, 2017; 2,400.98 reached on March 1, 2017.)

 

-NASDAQ +14.07% YTD down from last week’s +16.39%

  • 1yr Rtn +26.80% down from last week’s 27.60%

The Nasdaq reached its most recent new all-time high of 6,341.7 on June 9, 2017. (Previous highs include: 6,308.76 on June 2; 6,217.34 reached on May 25; 6,170,16 on May 16; 6,133 on May 9, 2017; 6102.72 on May 2, 2017; 6074.04 on April 28, 2017; and 5,936.39 on April 5, 2017.)

 

-Russell 2000 +4.29% YTD up a hair from last week’s +4.25%

  • 1yr Rtn +22.87% up from last week’s +20.69%

The Russell 2000 reached its latest all-time high of 1,433.789 on June 9, 2017. (Previous highs include 1,425.7 reached on April 26, 2017 and of 1,414,82 reached on March 1, 2017.)

-Mutual funds

Only a bit of a change in the average total return for funds that fall under the broad heading of U.S. Diversified Equity Fund. At the close of business on Thursday, June 29, 2017 the average equity fund’s year-to-date return was 7.52%. The previous week’s figure was 7.57%.

It’s still a Big World world for attractive returns. Year-to-date the average return for the 4,524 funds under World Equity Funds heading was the same last week as it was the previous at 15.28%.

The average Sector Equity Fund, a heading of 28 different fund types and includes everything from Health/Biotech, to Precious Metals and Commodies Energy had a year-to-date total return of 4.47%.

Mixed Asset Funds had an average return of 6.54%; Domestic L-T Fixed Income Funds, 2.56%; and World Income Funds, 6.04%

Visit www.allaboutfunds.com for more information about how various equity and fixed-income funds have rewarded investors over the short-and long-term, based upon Lipper data. Short-term meaning weekly and monthly performance returns; longer-term includes quarterly, year-to-date, 1-yr, 2-yr, 3-yr and 5-yr returns.

 

  • Investor sentiments waning?

Every week AAII reports the results of their sentiment survey.

During the week ending June 30,2017 results showed the bulls weren’t quite as popular as they once were as optimism about the markets fell from 32.65% down to 29.71%.

According to a Bespoke report, “That now makes it a record 130 straight week where half of the investors surveyed were not bullish.”

But wait. There’s more.

Even though the optimists are losing ground, so are the pessimists as bearish sentiment also fell. It went from 28.91% to 26.86% during that same time period.

Go figure.

-30-

 

 

POCKETBOOK: Week ending June 16, 2017

  • FullSizeRender(31)
  • Income investors

Funny thing about investors—seasoned as well as  newbies. For some reason they imagine, hope for and quite often expect annual returns that just aren’t likely to happen. Call it dreaming. Call it denial. Call it believing a sales pitch. Call it whatever you’d like but it turns out believing less is more is better for your psyche that expecting more and getting less.

But hasn’t expecting less always been a sound route to take in everything life and money related?

On that money score, Lisa Abramowicz wrote a piece for Bloomberg.com titled, “Stop Fooling Yourself About 8% Easy Returns”. The piece focuses on the results of a Legg Mason, Inc. survey of fixed-income investors.

Most were expecting average annual returns of 8.6%. Those still working expected 9%.

Both are in-your-dreams like state of annual return hopes. Unless, of course, your dreams are risky and racy.

Want to maybe be kinda sorta happy with your annual and longer term investment returns—fixed income or otherwise? Then think somewhere in the neighborhood of 5%—give or take.

 

  • Market Quick Glance

Any short-term investor and day trader looking for sound evidence that this market is headed in one direction or another probably understands better than most that each day is a new day. And as such, brings with it new opportunities and financial challenges and rewards.

Long-term investors would be wise to remember that as well.

Below are the weekly and 1-year index performance results— including the dates each reached new highs— according to data from CNBC.com. Data is based on prices at the close of business for the week ending on Friday, June 23, 2017.

-DJIA + 8.26% YTD up a hair from last week’s +8.21%

  • 1 yr Rtn +18.79% down from last week’s 20.59%

The DJIA reached a new all-time high of 21,535.03 on June 20, 2017. (Previous high of 21,391.97 reached on June 14, 2017; before it 21,305.35 on June 9, 2017; 21,225.04 on June 2, 2017; and 21,169.11 on March 1, 2017.)

 

-S&P 500 +8.91% YTD up a hair from last week’s 8.68%

  • 1yr Rtn +15.38% down a chuck from last week’s +17.09%

The S&P 500 reached a new all-time high of 2,453.82 on June 19,2017. (Previous high of 2,446.2 was reached on June 9, 2017. Before that 2,440.23 was reached on June 2, 2017; 2,418.71 reached on May 25, 2017; 2,405.77 reached on May 16, 2017; 2403.87 on May 9, 2017; 2,400.98 reached on March 1, 2017.)

 

-NASDAQ +16.39% YTD up attractively from last week’s +14.28%

  • 1yr Rtn +27.60% up from last week’s 26.97%

The Nasdaq reached its most recent new all-time high of 6,341.7 on June 9, 2017. (Previous highs include: 6,308.76 on June 2; 6,217.34 reached on May 25; 6,170,16 on May 16; 6,133 on May 9, 2017; 6102.72 on May 2, 2017; 6074.04 on April 28, 2017; and 5,936.39 on April 5, 2017.)

 

-Russell 2000 +4.25% YTD up a tidy amount from last week’s +3.65%

  • 1yr Rtn +20.69% down from last week’s +22.52%

The Russell 2000 reached its latest all-time high of 1,433.789 on June 9, 2017. (Previous highs include 1,425.7 reached on April 26, 2017 and of 1,414,82 reached on March 1, 2017.)

 

-Mutual funds

No big change in the average total return for funds that fall under the broad heading of U.S. Diversified Equity Fund. At the close of business on Thursday, June 22, 2017 the average equity fund’s year-to-date return was 7.57%. The previous week’s figure was 7.58%.

Those looking for attractive returns found them in World Equity Funds. Year-to-date the average return for the 4,533 funds under this heading was 15.28%. Wouldn’t you just love to lock a return like that in for the year?

The biggest scorers were India Region Funds, up on average 26.84%; Pacific Ex Japan Funds, 21.83%; China Region Funds, 21.46%;; and International Small/Mid-Cap Growth Funds, at 18.52%.

There are 26 different fund categories under that heading and only three of them had average total returns of under 10%. They were Latin American Funds, 9.61%; Global Multi-Cap Funds, 9.11%; and Global Equity Income Funds, 9.00%.

Visit www.allaboutfunds.com for more information about how various equity and fixed-income funds have rewarded investors over the short-and long-term, based upon Lipper data. Short-term meaning weekly and monthly performance returns; longer-term includes quarterly, year-to-date, 1-yr, 2-yr, 3-yr and 5-yr returns.

 

  • This could make you sick

Fingers crossed that the revised health-care plan the Senate has proposed will not get enough votes to pass. If it does, the poor, elderly and sick will become poorer and health care costs and premiums will continue to go up as they always have. Additionally, grandma will likely be asking you if she can move in as a number of those who need full-time care in nursing homes will get the boot.

And don’t believe the way too bleached blonde Kellyanne Conway who says those on Medicaid who lose health care coverage can always get a job with a company that has health insurance and will cover them. That’s just plain poppycock and simply not true. It’s also a perfect example of how out of touch this White House and its administration is with millions upon millions of people who make up our population in America.

So, if you’re looking for some startling data on where in the country and in which states a repeal of Obamacare would impact people the most, BusinessInsider.com can help. In a story titled, “MAP: Areas of the US where an Obamacare repeal would hit the heardest”, are two maps worth looking at.

In one map you will see the areas in the U.S. where a repeal of Obamacare would impact people the most. In the second is a state by state look. Do check out both.

The story and the maps can be found here: http://www.businessinsider.com/where-obamacare-repeal-would-hit-the-hardest-map-2017-6

 

-30-

 

POCKETBOOK: Week ending June 9, 2017

FullSizeRender(31)

  • A correction on its way?

 The fine folks at the Bespoke Investment Group have a way of clarifying all things market related using historic facts and figures.

From them comes this bundle of S&P goodies that may or may not help you with your investing goals and expectations:

  • The S&P 500 hasn’t had a 10% correction in the last 16 months.
  • The current rally has lasted 477 calendar days making it the 11th longest run for that index without a 10% correction since 1928.
  • If you think that the S&P 500 is going to continue the rally and hope it becomes one of the longest running rallies around, it needs to run another 173 days.
  • To pull that off, this rally would have to go on past Thanksgiving.

Looks like enthusiastic S&P 500 bulls need to think “turkey trot”.

BTW, Bespoke also reported that when a correction does come along after rallies lasting  10 years or more, the decline has been  15.7% over 142 days. “Compared to all corrections since 1928 where the average decline was 19.5%,…”

 

  • Market Quick Glance

Believe it or not, the S&P 500 and the NASDAQ were both down from their previous week’s close and their 1-year returns were down as well. That means the star performing index turned out to be the Russell 2000—it was up on both scores.

Depending upon which money guru you read or take the advice of, the bull market in equities is getting a little long in the tooth or still has plenty of space to run.

Below are weekly and 1-year performance results— including the dates each reached new highs— according to data from CNBC.com. Data is based on prices at the close of business for the week ending on Friday, June 9, 2017.

 

-DJIA +7.64% YTD up from last week’s +7.30%

  • 1 yr Rtn +18.27% down from last week’s 19.08%

The DJIA reached a new all-time high of 21,305.35 on June 9, 2017. That’s one week after the 21,225.04 high reached on June 2, 2017. (Previous high of 21,169.11 was reached on March 1, 2017.)

 

-S&P 500 +8.62% YTD down from last week’s 8.90%

  • 1yr Rtn +14.95% down from last week’s +16.15%

The S&P 500 reached a new all-time high of 2,446.2 on June 9, 2017. That’s one week after the 2,440.23 reached on June 2, 2017. (Previous highs of 2,418.71 was reached on May 25, 2017; the high of 2,405.77 was reached on May 16, 2017; the high of 2403.87 was reached on May 9, 2017; and the a high of 2,400.98 was reached on March 1, 2017. )

 

 

-NASDAQ +15.32% YTD down from last week’s +17.14%

  • 1yr Rtn +25.19% down from last week’s 26.84%

The NASDAQ reached another new all-time high of 6,341.7 on June 9, 2017. (Some of the other previous highs include:6,308.76 on June 2; 6,217.34 reached on May 25; 6,170,16 on May 16; 6,133 on May 9, 2017; 6102.72 on May 2, 2017; 6074.04 on April 28, 2017; and 5,936.39 on April 5, 2017.)

 

–Russell 2000 +4.76% YTD up from last week’s +3.56%

  • 1yr Rtn +20.36 % upfrom last week’s +20.06%

The Russell 2000 reached a new all-time high of 1,433.789 on June 9, 2017. (Previous high of 1,425.7 was reached on April 26, 2017 and before that a high of 1,414,82 was reached on March 1, 2017.)

 

-Mutual funds

The average U.S. Diversified Equity Fund was up a tad from the previous week. So, at the close of business on Thursday, June 8, 2017 the average equity fund’s year-to-date return was 7.90%. The previous week’s figure was 7.56%.

Once again, the top performance categories under that heading are beginning to sound like a broken record—with one exception: the order has changed. The top performing group was Equity Leverage Funds, up 17.47 ahead of Large-Cap Growth Funds up 17.21% followed by Multi-Cap Growth Funds, up 15.77%

For a second week in a row the average Sector Fund return barely budged and ended the week up 4.79% a hair about the previous week’s close of 4.78%.

It is still a Global Science/Technology Funds world, up 27.58%. And Commodities Energy Funds continued to lose more ground with the average fund -19.37% ( previous week the figure was -16.07%).

Visit www.allaboutfunds.com for more information about how various equity and fixed-income funds have rewarded investors over the short-and long-term, based upon Lipper data. Short-term meaning weekly and monthly performance returns; longer-term includes quarterly, year-to-date, 1-yr, 2-yr, 3-yr and 5-yr returns.

 

  • Rate hikes

The Fed is expected to raise rates by 25 basis points—that translates to one-quarter of one percent.

That means life has gotten more expensive for anyone with an adjustable mortgage or home equity line of credit, or who is applying for a new mortgage, car loan or has with credit card debt that isn’t paid off in full each month.

It also means banks will be getting more of your money should you have any of the relationships mentioned above in place.

Unfortunately, an interest rate increase like that won’t mean much for savers who earn interes on their savings accounts.

-30-

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

POCKETBOOK: Week ending May 19, 2017

IMG_2607

  • Loving our rides

About 43% of the population has an auto loan. That translates to a record 107 million Americans and up from 80 million in 2012, according to figures from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York.

Of those 107 million, roughly 6 million people are 90 days or more behind on their car payments.

Oh dear. That’s bad news for people who need their vehicles but can’t afford them. And good news for those with the how-in-the-world-can-they-do-that-job Repo Man.

 

  • Market Quick Glance

Although the 1-week and 1-year returns on all of the four indices below show mixed results, what’s staggerily delightful is how these indices have performed over the past year: The DJIA up over 19%; the S&P 500 up over 16%, NASDAQ ahead over 29% and the Russell 2000 up nearly 25%. Those kind of 1-year returns aren’t common—they are exceptional.

Be mindful of that.

Below are the weekly and 1-year performance results— including the dates each reached new highs— according to data from CNBC.com. Data is based on prices at the close of business for the week ending on Friday, May 19, 2017.

-Indices:

-Dow Jones +5.27% YTD down from last week’s 5.74%

  • 1yr Rtn +19.33% up from last week’s 17.92%

The DJIA reached an all-time high of 21,169.11 on March 1, 2017.

 

-S&P 500 +6.38% YTD down from last week’s 6.79%

  • 1yr Rtn +16.75% up from last week’s +15/83%

The S&P 500 reached a new all-time high of 2,405.77o on May 16, 2017. (The previous high of 2403.87 was reached on May 9, 2017. Before that, the previous high of 2,400.98 was reached on March 1, 2017. )

 

-NASDAQ +13.01% YTD down from last week’s +13.71%

  • 1yr Rtn +29.10% down from last week’s 29.21%

The NASDAQ reached another new all-time high for the fourth time this year of 6,170,16 on May 16, 2017. (The previous high of 6,133 was reached on May 9, 2017 and before that 6102.72 reached on May 2, 2017. Before that the new high of 6074.04 was achieved on April 28, 2017 and before that date a high of 5,936.39 hit on April 5, 2017.)

 

–Russell 2000 +0.75% YTD down from last week’s +1.89%

  • 1yr Rtn +24.90% up from last week’s +24.73%

The Russell 2000 reached a new all-time high of 1,425.7 on April 26, 2017.

(Its previous high of 1,414,82 was reached on March 1, 2017.)

 

-Mutual funds

At the close of business on Thursday, May 18, 2017, the average year-to-date performance of U.S Divesifed Equity Funds was +4.77%.

Under that broad umbrella heading it was Large-Cap Growth Funds that lead the way, up 12.68%, followed by Multi-Cap Growth Funds, up 11.41% and then Equity Leverage Funds, up 11.39%.

Under the Sector Funds heading it was Global Science/Technology Funds returning the most with the average fund in it up 20.95%. And under the World Equity Funds heading, India Region Funds continue to reign, up on average 24.56%.

Visit www.allaboutfunds.com for more information about how various equity and fixed-income funds have rewarded investors over the short-and long-term, based upon Lipper data. Short-term meaning weekly and monthly performance returns; longer-term includes quarterly, year-to-date, 1-yr, 2-yr, 3-yr and 5-yr returns.

•Keeping up with the Jones’ and the U.S. Census Bureau

According to TheBalance.com, every 10 years the U.S. Census Bureau comes out with figures that measure the average net worth of all of us.The last time the numbers were calculated  was in 2011 and the next one coming is in 2021. Their net worth results take into consideration upon both household income and age. For instance, while the median wealth per household for all households is $68,828, the median wealth of those younger than 35 is only $6,676.Look at other age groups and you’ll find different results. For those aged 55-64, the median wealth jumps to $143,964. And where you’ll find the wealthiest households is for those  in which the age range is 75 or more, it’s $155,714.If you’re puzzled by these figures, and think they seem considerable lower than what you may have heard or read before, keep in mind that the U.S. Census Bureau and the U.S. government don’t count things in the same way. Surprise. Surprise.Why? Because the gov looks at wealth by income while the U.S. Census Bureau by net worth. Using the governments income figures, for the 20 percent of folks whose income falls in the lowest quintile their median net worth is -$6,029. Those in the middle, have an average net worth of $68,828. And those in the top 20 percent have an median net worth of $630,754.So that explains why there is such a huge difference in median net worth figures. And, how close to impossible it is to keep up with the Jones’.
Read the full story, “What Is the Average American Net Worth?”, written by Kimberly Amadeo and updated on May 12, 2017 at www.thebalance.com ,

 

-30-

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

POCKETBOOK: Week ending April 28, 2017

  • FullSizeRender(31)
  • It’s May

 Fans of the Wall Street adage, “ Sell in May and go away”, know the strategy has some merit  and historically has paid off. On paper anyway.

Folks at the Bespoke Investment Group did their research and found that  $100 invested for 50 years in the S&P 500 and owning stocks from May through October would have returned a puny $139. But investing 100 bucks and owning stocks for 50 years from November through April would have paid off to the tune of $2,136.

Huh.

  • Market Quick Glance

A big week for a couple of indices: Both the NASDAQ and the Russell 2000 reached new highs during the week ending Friday, April 28, 2017. Yippy skippy for them. The DJIA and S&P 500 preformed well too, just no new highs.

Below are the weekly and 52-week performance results— including the dates each has reached its high according to data from CNBC.com. Data is based on prices at the close of business for the week ending on Friday, April 28, 2017.

-Indices:

-Dow Jones +5.96% YTD up attractively from last week’s 3.97%

  • 1yr Rtn +17.447% up from last week’s 14.27%

The DJIA reached an all-time high of 21,169.11 on March 1, 2017.

 

-S&P 500 +6.45% YTD up from last week’s 4.91%

  • 1yr Rtn +14.86% up from last week’s +12.30%

The S&P 500 reached an all-time high of 2,400.98 on March 1, 2017.

 

-NASDAQ +12.34% YTD up handsomely from last week’s +9.80%

  • 1yr Rtn +25.85% up from last week’s 19.50%

The Nasdaq reached a new all-time high of 6074.04 on April 28, 2017.

(Its previous high of 5,936.39 on April 5, 2017.)

 

–Russell 2000 +3.19% YTD up from last week’s +1.67%

  • 1yr Rtn +22.80% up from last week’s +21.49%

The Russell 2000 reached a new all-time high of 1,425.7 on April 26, 2017.

(Its previous high of 1,414,82 was reached on March 1, 2017.)

 

-Mutual funds

Moving ahead.

At the close of business on Thursday, April 27 ,2017, the average total return for U.S. Diversified Equity Funds was 6.40%. That’s a nice jump up from last week’s 4.64%, according to Lipper.

Four fund types with the highest average returns under that broad heading and through that date were Equity Leverage Funds, 13.69%, Large-Cap Growth Funds, 12.14%, Multi-Cap Growth Funds, 11.42% and Mid-Cap Growth Funds, 10.05%

Under the Sector Equity heading where the average fund is up 4.07%, Global Science Funds were the biggest winners with average y-t-d returns of 17.98%. Commodities Energy Funds the biggest losers, down 13.68%.

And around the world it’s India where the money is being made. Lipper tracks 24 India Region Funds. Average y-t-d return for the group was 25.13%

Visit www.allaboutfunds.com for more information about how various equity and fixed-income funds have rewarded investors over the short-and long-term, based upon Lipper data. Short-term meaning weekly and monthly performance returns; longer-term includes quarterly, year-to-date, 1-yr, 2-yr, 3-yr and 5-yr returns.

• Lookout

A few things to consider going forward:

  1. Last week I wrote that expecting less from the stock market might wind up being more so I’m with Jack Bogle, the founder of Vanguard, who recently warned investors to plan for and expect lower returns going forward. “These are hazardous time. There are not cheap times. In the market, one never knows what is coming next,” said Bogle in a CNBC interview.
  2. Covering the costs of a tax reform plan that is based on the relative short-term future growth of our country is as goofy as thinking that the Earth is flat. Economic growth is not a sure thing in the near- or short-term. Outlooks, hopes and promises saying so are poppycock.
  3. Never invested in stocks before? Don’t start now unless you are absolutely positively sure that you don’t/won’t need the money anytime soon. Like in  the next three, five, 10 or 15 months or even a few years out. Investing over the short-term always comes with accepting much more risk than does investing for the long-term, like 10, 20, 30, or 50 years.

 

 

 

-30-