Tag Archives: Lipper mutual fund performance

POCKETBOOK: Week ending July 9, 2016

  • IMG_0204Ranges of the Top 1%

Life would be much simpler if facts were carved in stone–unchangeable. Something you could count on. Take to the bank.

But they’re not. So if you think that becoming a member in that elite sliver of 1 percenter’s lakes an income of $1,000,000 you’d be way off.

All it takes to be considered part of the 1% crowd, a family only needs an income of around $390,000. That’s it, according to CNNMoney.

But wait, there’s more: According to IRS, 1% status varies from state to state.

So, wanna be a Big Wig and live in Connecticut, the average income of  the 1% there  is $659,979. In Massachusetts the level is more than  $100,000 less; $539,055. In New York, $517,557.

Have an annual income of less than  $250,000 and you’d be in that 1% group if you live in West Virginia, Arkansas, or New Mexico.

•Market Quick Glance

 

Below are the YTD performances of various US indices ending Friday, July 8, 2016, according to Bloomberg. One-year performance figures are also included.

 

-Indices:

-Dow Jones +5.66% YTD

  • 1yr Rtn +4.93%

-S&P 500 +5.45%

  • 1yr Rtn +4.85%

NASDAQ -0.28% YTD

  • 1yr Rtn +0.53%

Russell 2000 +4.49 YTD 

1yr Rtn -4.52%

If you’re looking for future guidance in today’s current market, perhaps Bob Dole, senior portfolio manager at Nuveen Asset Management said it best. In  a Bloomberg interview he  said we are in a period of “more muddle thorough.”

I believe he has hit the nail on the head.

-Mutual funds

Through Thursday, July 7, 2016 the average U.S.Diversified Equity Fund was up 1.44 percent, according to Lipper.

Under this umbrella heading that included 8,403 equity funds, Equity Leverage Funds had an  impressive YTD average return of 13.02%. But don’t get too excited about hopping on this fund type train as performance can be seriously rocky. For example, a week ago the average fund here was down 0.7%. And, the average performance over the past 52 weeks  down  4.9%. But,  over the past 5 years, up 7%.

Screaming into the over 100% average performance return lane are Precious Metals Equity Funds. At Thursday’s close the average one under this heading was up 115.54%. Miles behind it, but definitely with serious returns, are Commodities Precious Metals Fund, up 29.52%.

Leaving Sector Funds and  among  World Equity Funds,  Latin American Funds are up an impressive 22.61.% YTD.

Visit www.allaboutfunds.com for weekly updates to see how various equity and fixed-income funds have rewarded investors over the short-and long-term, based upon Lipper data. Short-term meaning weekly and monthly performance returns; longer-term includes quarterly, year-to-date, 1-yr, 2-yr, 3-yr and 5-yr returns.

Lipper’s weekly performance figures for stock and fixed-income funds are at www.allaboutfunds.com in the left column on the home page.

•Daily Improvements

Benjamin Franklin was no slouch. He was a statesman, author, inventor, etc. who left us with oh-so much including a simple prescription for how to live a productive life.

Anyone who wants to make a  brilliant difference in the world, as Franklin did, might want to follow the disciplined habits of his daily life.

According to a post at Inc.com by Michael Simmons, Franklin got up early and spent one hour every day reading/learning. He also set goals, hung out with like-minded artisans and tradesmen, turned his ideas into experiences and spent time each day in reflection.

Amazing how simple habits can reward us.

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POCKETBOOK: Week ending June 4, 2016

  • IMG_0204

  • Welcome to June

I’m guessing investors can expect the same from the equity markets this summer as they can from their summer travel experiences: No relief from worries about the direction of the stock markets or from the weather and the storms typically accompanying them.

Then again, worrying about things to come has never paid much of a dividend. Enjoying the moment, however, certainly has.

  • Market Quick Glance

-Indices:

Below are the year-to-date performance figures for the major indices through June 3, 2016, according to Bloomberg. To provide a longer performance perspective, 1-year returns have been added.

The Russell 2000 was the only index of the four below that enjoyed any noteworthy upward change—its y-t-d return gained about 1.5%.

-Dow Jones +3.49% YTD

1yr Rtn +2.44%

-S&P 500 +3.71%YTD

1yr Rtn +2.51%

NASDAQ -0.66% YTD

1yr Rtn -1.17%

Russell 2000 +3.12 YTD

1yr Rtn -6.31%

-Mutual funds

Through Thursday, June 2, 2016 the average U.S.Diversified Equity Fund jumped into positive territory ending the week up 2.65 percent, according to Lipper. Last week, if you remember, the average year-to-date returns of this group of 815 funds was down 1.29 percent.

It was Equity Leverage Funds that ruled the performance roost as the y-t-d performance of the 200 funds in that category had an average return of 7.40 percent. Behind it  Mid-Cap Value Funds with their average return of 6.45 percent followed by Small-Cap Value Funds at 6.45 percent.

Precious Metals Equity Funds are still rewarding their shareholders as the average return of this group was up 63.83 percent. Those rewards, however, just aren’t as much as they had been. Three weeks ago, (May 19), the average return of funds in this group was 75.64 percent. Now the return is 11.8 percent lower that the one reported on May 19.

One more thing: That 3-year average return of U.S.Diversifed Equity funds pointed out  in last week’s POCKETBOOK  of over 9 percent has shriveled  22 basis points to 8.80 percent.

I mention that only because investors need to look beyond current returns and back a few years to get a real sense of what’s happening in the market regarding the direction of equities.

It’s still an iffy market with recession worries that aren’t going away.

Visit www.allaboutfunds.com for weekly updates to see how equity and fixed-income funds have rewarded investors over the short-and long-term, based upon Lipper data. Short-term meaning weekly and monthly performance returns; longer-term includes quarterly, year-to-date, 1-yr, 2-yr, 3-yr and 5-yr returns.

Lipper’s weekly performance figures for stock and fixed-income funds are at www.allaboutfunds.com in the left column on the home page.

  • BMOs July outlook

I know, it’s still June but BMO likes to keep on top of things. And, in the BMO Wealth Management  June 2 report titled “July 2016 Outlook for Financial Markets” , its Summary by Jack A. Ablin,  BMOs Chief Investment Officer, is worth sharing.

Here’s the Summary:

“•Temp jobs are the first to go in a downturn. The sector has shed 27,400 jobs since December, reversing a five-year trend that saw it grow five times faster than overall employment.

“•Businesses are awash in more than $1.8 trillion of cash –and the 25 largest companies control more than half of the hoard. While this corporate “one percent” is up to its armpits in cash, the bottom 99 percent is swimming in debt.

“•What’s bothering the corner office? Consumers are confident, spending is strong and interest rates are low, yet companies aren’t spending.

“•Despite becoming an increasingly distant memory with every passing year, the housing bust and financial crisis inflicted lasting scars on American households.

“•Conviction and complacency are running hot, setting investors up for a surprise. “

Pocketbook: Week ending April 30, 2016

IMG_0204

  • More bang for your buck

Thanks to the exchange rate, spend 1 US dollar in Canada and you’ll get about $1.20 worth of their goods and services. Or, one more good reason to visit our neighbors to the North.

  • Market Quick Glance

-Indices:

Here are the year-to-date performance figures for the major indices through April 29, 2016, according to Bloomberg. To provide a longer performance perspective, 1-year returns have been added.

Stocks had a tough week with the indices all registering poorer performance at the end of this week than the previous one.

Looks as though a good dividend paying stock, or stocks, could be this year’s most rewarding picks.

Dow Jones +2,83% YTD

1yr Rtn +1.21%

-S&P 500 +1.74% YTD

1yr Rtn +0.10%

NASDAQ -4.23% YTD

1yr Rtn -3.35%

-Russell 2000 +0.02% YTD

1yr Rtn -6.57%

-Mutual funds

Through Thursday, April 28, 2016 the average U.S.Diversified Equity Fund lost ground during the past seven days. While still up modestly for the year, the average fund under this heading that includes 8401 funds was up 1.00 percent year-to-date, according to Lipper.

Equity Leveraged Funds, Lipper tracks 202 of them, have year-to-date returns of 8.2 percent, on average. Behind them were Small- and Mid-Cap Value Funds with year-to-date returns up 5.16 and 5.03 percent respectively.

Dedicated Short-Bias Funds gained some strength, down now only -9.94 percent y-t-d instead of -11.15 percent from the 4/21 weekly report.

As always, it’s Sector Equity Funds where investors will find the best performing fund groups. Thanks to the Precious Metals Funds, up on average 73.83 percent as of Thursday’s close (that’s 8 percent higher than the week previous), the average Sector Equity Fund was up 6.35 percent y-t-d.

Health/Biotech fund types continue losing ground this year.

Visit www.allaboutfunds.com for weekly updates to see how equity and fixed-income funds have rewarded investors over the short-and long-term, based upon Lipper data. Short-term meaning weekly and monthly performance returns; longer-term includes quarterly, year-to-date, 1-yr, 2-yr, 3-yr and 5-yr returns.

Lipper’s weekly performance figures for stock and fixed-income funds are at www.allaboutfunds.com in the left column on the home page.

  • The economy, Buffett, Icahn and me

No two ways about it, the economy is not moving along at a robust pace. And there’s a yellow cautionary flag waving with respect to the near  and not-so-near term future.

So what’s an investor to do? Buffett admits that the economy is not booming, nor is it falling apart.  Carl Icahn says there is big trouble ahead.I say, mind your p’s and q’s.

That means, review your “p”ortfolio and “q”uestion all of your holdings. Then decide again, if the risks you’ve taken to make a buck are as valid today as they were the day you decided to take them.

And don’t forget: no one ever went broke taking a profit.

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POCKETBOOK

IMG_0204

For the week ending Feb. 27, 2016

  • Good news for snail-mailers

Yahoo! Come April 10, a first-class stamp will only cost 47 cents instead of its current 49-cent price, according to CNNMoney.com.

When that happens it will be the first time in 97 years that the price of a stamp will have been decreased. That’s the good news. The not-so-good news is the 2-cent savings per stamp is estimated to cost the Post Office $2 billion a year.

So why do it?

According to the Feb. 26th CNNMoney story, “The reduction is part of a pre-arranged agreement with Congress. The Post Office got to increase the price of stamps by 3 cents in 2014 to help it raise $4.6 billion in revenue. But the price hike was only set to last two years. (It gets to keep one cent of the increase to keep up with inflation)….”

How’s that for not making a lot of cents.

 

  • Market Quick Glance

-Indices:

Below are year-to-date performance figures for the major indices through February 26, 2016 according to Bloomberg. To provide a longer performance perspective, 1-year returns have been added.

Dow Jones -3.97% YTD

1yr Rtn -5.85 %

-S&P 500 -4.31% YTD

1yr Rtn -5.43%

NASDAQ -8.11%YTD

1yr Rtn -6.34%

-Russell 2000 -8.52% YTD

1yr Rtn -14.71%

If year-to-date performances are any indication of a trend, all four market indices are doing better. For how long, however,  remains to be seen.

 

-Mutual funds

Through Thursday, February 25, 2016 the average U.S.Diversified Equity fund was down 6.03 percent, year-to-date, according to Lipper.

Without sounding like a broken record, Dedicated Short Bias funds continue to be the top performing fund type under the General Equity Funds heading. They were up on average 8.18 percent. And, Diversified Leveraged funds down the most, off 12.11percent on average. In both instances the high return isn’t as high as it was last week and the down group not off as much.

Precious Metal funds also continue to be top performers under the World Equity Funds heading—up on average almost 33.38 percent. That figure is about 4 percent higher than last week’s.

Visit www.allaboutfunds.com for weekly updates to see how equity and fixed-income funds have rewarded investors over the short-and long-term, based upon Lipper data. Short-term meaning weekly and monthly performance returns; longer-term includes quarterly, year-to-date, 1-yr, 2-yr, 3-yr and 5-yr returns.

Lipper’s weekly performance figures for stock and fixed-income funds are at www.allaboutfunds.com in the left column on the home page.

 

-Vizualization pays off

Having a war chest fat enough to cover the cost of the decades many will live in retirement is no easy task. And often unattainable.

But not to worry, there’s hope in imagining.

Results from a recent TDBank survey found that people who visualize stuff—either through imaginations or via photos and vision boards—have an easier time succeeding at meeting their goals. Even financial ones.

Of the 1,100 people in the study, 38 percent reported better financial health when they visualized things.

From the CBSNEWS.com story: “Financial advisors may tell you to keep your emotions out of money, but the psychologists will tell you that’s impossible,” said Dr. Barbara Nusbaum, a psychologist who partnered with TD Bank to analyze the study. “You’re better off bringing emotions in positively to help your financial planning.”

Huh.

So why not give picturing a try. It won’t cost you anything and who knows, it could be rewarding.

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POCKETBOOK

IMG_0204For the week ending Feb. 6, 2016

  • The monkey and football.

Monday, February 8 is a big day for the Chinese and  football fans. Not sure which order to put them in, so I’ll begin with the one with the longest history.
February 8 marks the beginning of Chinese New Year and this year it is the Year of the Monkey. If you’re wondering what that can mean money-wise, well, the news isn’t great.

According to feng shui master Chen Shuaifu, “In 2016 we will see a big slide in the world economy,” he warns. “The global economic situation will be terrible and lots of companies will be bankrupted.”

Yikes! But there’s good news, too.

While Shuaifu  recommends postponing important financial decisions for those born in the Year of the Monkey, he also said, “It’s a good year for people to give birth and to look for love…..Babies born in the Year of the Monkey are regarded as very hardworking and lucky.”

Whew!

As for football: Given that millions of people are unable to get out of bed and into work the day after the Big Game and a full and night of football partying, you’d think the powers that be would make the Monday following Super Bowl Sunday a national holiday.

Suggest that to your Congress person.

  • Market Quick Glance

-Indices:

Below are year-to-date performance figures for the major indices through February 5, 2016 according to Bloomberg. To provide a broader performance perspective, 1-year retuns have been added.

-Dow Jones -6.79% YTD

1yr Rtn -6.79 %

-S&P 500 -7.84% YTD

1yr Rtn -6.59%

-NASDAQ -12.761%YTD

1yr Rtn -6.89%

-Russell 2000 -13.15% YTD

1yr Rtn -17.09%

 

-Mutual funds

Through Thursday, February 4, 2016 the average U.S.Diversified Equity fund was down 7.45 percent, according to Lipper. Over the past 52 weeks, the average performance for this group of 8,449 funds was down 8.91 percent.

Sector Equity Funds were down an average of 5.14 percent for that same week, World Income Funds off 6.92 percent and Mixed Asset Funds down 3.92 percent.

Visit www.allaboutfunds.com for weekly updates to see how equity and fixed-income funds have rewarded investors over the short-and long-term, based upon Lipper data. Short-term meaning weekly and monthly performance returns; longer-term includes quarterly, year-to-date, 1-yr, 2-yr, 3-yr and 5-yr returns.

Lipper’s weekly performance figures for stock and fixed-income funds are at www.allaboutfunds.com in the left column on the home page.

-Money Love

With Valentine’s Day right around the corner, do your best not to confuse love with money. Why? Because studies show that  there is an awful lot of financial infidelity going on between spouses and partners, these days. And that ain’t exactly love.

Of course I think that’s nothing new. But somehow others like to read official reports before they believe it to be so.

So, according to recent poll results from CreditCards.com study,” About 13 million Americans could be maintaining secret bank accounts, or credit cards without their partners knowledge.”

My suggestion: You’d better think twice about asking your sweetie to marry you on Valentine’s Day unless you’ve had The Talk.

That would be the one where the two of you sit down to discuss how you feel about money, how the bills will be paid and money to be spent and saved, etc.

No matter how young or old you are, or how many times you have or have not been married, or shared a residence with a love, that money talk is the most important must-have conversation a couple will  ever  have.

 

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POCKETBOOK

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For the week ending Jan. 23, 2016

       •Our brain on money

Turns out the part of our brain that gets turned on when using cocaine is the same part of our brain that gets turned on when we’re making money.

From a Wealthmanagement.com story last week, comes this: “According to Kabir Sehgal, author of Coined, people making money and those high on cocaine had nearly identical brain scans. When further looking at brain scans of people who were high, images of money produced the most brain activity compared to those of naked women or dead bodies…”

Apparently outside influences also have a hand in how we make  financial decisions as that same story reported  people tend to tip more generously when the weather is nice and sunny. “Money obviously acts as a neural stimulant and it makes us act in very sort of irrational ways,” Sehgal said, as quoted on MedicalDaily.com. “And so the part of the brain that lights up, again the nucleus accumbens, keeps on firing and firing and firing and obviously money excites us.”

No word on what happens to our brains when we are losing money.

On that note, here is how the markets have performed recently.

  • Market Quick Glance

-Indices:

Year-to-date performance figures for the major indices through January 22, 2016 according to Bloomberg. To provide a broader performance perspective, 1-year returns have been added.

-S&P 500 -6.61% YTD and 1-yr Rtn -5.61%

-Dow Jones -7.62% YTD and 1-yr Rtn -7.39%

-NASDAQ -8.28%YTD and 1-yr Rtn 2-.09%

-Russell 2000 -10.11% YTD and 1-yr Rtn -13.07%

-Mutual funds

Through Thursday, January 21, 2016 the average U.S.Diversified Equity fund was down 9.24%, according to Lipper. That’s a tad better than the 52-week performance of minus 9.51%.

World Equity Funds, on average, were off 10.65%. China Region, Japanese and Latin American funds taking the biggest hits. They were down 15.86%; 12.92%; and 12.20% respectively.

We all know China’s woes have become the world’s woes but one reason for the Latin American Funds’ lousy showing could be because the peso has fallen to its lowest value ever against the U.S. dollar: One Mexican peso is now worth barely more than a nickel (0.053 cents).

That’s bad news for emerging market investors but good news for anyone traveling to Mexico where the value of our dollars will now buy more sombreros than you can imagine.

Visit www.allaboutfunds.com for weekly updates to see how equity and fixed-income funds have rewarded investors over the short-and long-term, based upon Lipper data. Short-term meaning weekly and monthly performance returns; longer-term includes quarterly, year-to-date, 1-yr, 2-yr, 3-yr and 5-yr returns.

You will find all of Lipper’s weekly performance figures on both stock and fixed-income funds at www.allaboutfunds.com in the left column on the home page.

On another note, as of last November, when there were 12 Republican candidates running for our nation’s highest office, funds run by Goldman were favored by nearly 2-to-1. In second place, Vanguard funds. The tally was 57 to 28, according to Reuters.

-Stocks

Louis Navellier’s January 21, 2016 newsletter addressed the question of whether now was the time to buy energy stocks.

His answer was nope:” I advise everyone to continue to avoid energy and commodities stocks. Instead, I’m loading up on consumer stocks that are benefitting from falling oil prices, “ he wrote.

Here’s his reasoning: “Unfortunately, it looks like we’re going to work hard to keep that from happening. China’s slowing economy and currency devaluation have investors worried, and as the dollar continues to gain strength, U.S. markets are at an increasing disadvantage.

“There is good news in the midst of this, though: Congress recently passed a controversial budget bill that lifted the 40-year ban on crude oil exports. Two tankers have already left from Texas ports, and more shipments are expected soon. So hopefully, we can use this to balance out our crude stores.

“In the meantime, though, energy stocks are not the place to be. Natural gas prices are near 14-year lows, and crude oil is at a 12-year low. Kinder Morgan recently cut its dividend by 75% to help preserve its credit rating, and I would not be surprised if more energy companies follow suit.”

-Opportunity or not

Iran could be the hottest place for stocks over the next five years.

Speaking at Davos, Mohammad Nahavandian, the chief of staff to Iran’s president, expects the Iranian economy to grow at an average of 8 percent a year over the next five years.

“Iran may be one of the most promising emerging markets of the coming decades,” Nahavandian said.

Why? Because economic sanctions have been lifted thus opening the door for massive business opportunities.

  • Living:

 -You can kiss WalMart Greeter jobs good-bye.

If part of your retirement working plan was  to be a greeter at WalMart, the bad news is 269 of those stores will be closing; 154 of them in the U.S. Sorry.

Seems kinda weird. It wasn’t that many months ago when the chain, known for its cheapness on a variety of levels, announced they would increase hourly pay to 10 bucks. After that began, store closures were announced.

Go figure.

-Rents moving on up

Reis reported apartment rents up 4.6 percent, averaging $1,180, last year. That’s the fastest growth pace since 2007.

-Disgraceful income gaps

The world’s 62 richest billionaires have as much wealth as the bottom half of the world’s population, according to a new report from Oxfam International.

Let’s see, if the world’s population is 7.4 billion, half of that would be 3.7 billion. So, if that is  true, it means the combined wealth of 62 individuals equals the combined wealth of 3.7 billion people.

There’s something very very very wrong with that.

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POCKETBOOK

 

$$$ review for week ending Dec.11, 2015:

  • Net worth

“The MEDIAN net worth of folks 65-74 is $190k. That means half of everyone has more and the other half has less, which is a far better reflection of how wealth is distributed than the “average”….”

(Source: Regarded Solutions, SeekingAlpha.com)

  • Market Quick Glance

-Indices

Year-to-date returns based on Friday’s close (12/11/15) show the DJIA and S&P 500 indexes down less than 1 percent;   0.72 percent and 0.27 percent respectively. The year’s big winner so far is NASDAQ, up 5.46 percent.

-Mutual funds

Lipper’s mutual fund performance figures are published every Thursday.The data is updated weekly and provides the best one-stop-shopping overview of how various types of funds have performed over the short and long term that  you’ll find anywhere.You can read abaout them all in the column to the left of Dian’s Column at http://www.Allaboutfunds.com . Please read through it every week. The more you know about how your fund’s performance measures up against other like funds, the better investor you’ll become.

That said, here are a few Lipper  year-to-date performance highlights for the week ending Thursday, December 10, 2015:

-Under the World Income Fund category, Japanese Funds have rewarded their shareholders the most. Of the 51 funds included in  it, the group’s average was up 11.46 percent.

-On the other hand, the biggest losing group was Latin American Funds. Of the 49 funds under that heading the group average was down 27.58 percent.

-Under the U.S. Equity Fund heading, of which there are 8,409 funds, the average group return was down 1.43 percent.

-Lipper keeps tabs on 2,637,660 fixed-income funds. Year-to-date, the average return on this lot was down 1.45 percent.

  • Dividend investing: Kinda Hot and Cold Rewards

First, the hot-ish rewards….

From Morningstar’s ETF Specialist column: “Dividend Investing: Man vs. Machine …..On average, dividend-oriented ETFs beat their actively managed mutual fund counterparts in each of the four categories studied. Most of the funds in the sample were in the large-value category, where the average ETF returned 12.25% during the five years ended Sept. 30, 2015, compared with 10.67% for the average actively managed, dividend-oriented mutual fund.”

Now, the cold-ish….

If you’re a fan of dividend investing as I am –and so are most people who’ve made any money over the long haul— below is an interesting  list included in  USA TODAY’s Matt Krantz’s piece published 12/11/15 , ” 13 companies can’t afford their big dividends”.

“2015 S&P 500 COMPANIES PAYING OUT MORE IN DIVIDENDS THAN THEY’VE EARNED *

-Company, Symbol, Dividend yield, payout ratio

-Kinder Morgan, KMI, 12.1%, 329.6%

-ONEOK, OKE, 11.1%, 160.3%

-Williams, WMB, 8.85%, 528.8%

-Frontier Communications, FTR, 8.54%, NM **

-CenturyLink, CTL, 8.19%, 166.1%

-Iron Mountain, IRM, 7.17%, 421.4%

-Wynn Resort, WYNN, 7.15%, 359.1%

-HCP, HCP, 6.29%, 437.9%

-Spectra Energy, SE, 6.18%, 128.4%

-Murphy Oil, MUR, 6.13%, NM

-ConocoPhillips, COP, 6.11%, NM

-CenterPoint Energy, CNP, 6.03%, NM

-Mattel, MAT, 6.01, 169.2%”

(* Based on dividends and net income the past 12 months.Source: S&P Capital IQ, USA TODAY)

Full story at: http://www.usatoday.com/story/money/markets/2015/12/11/payout-ratio-big-dividends-afford/77115700/

  • Giving

According to Wealth-X, hugely rich entrepreneurs do give.

From their recent press release,” America’s Billionaire Entrepreneurs Give Nearly US$180 Million In Lifetime, More Than Other UHNW Donor Groups”, comes this:

“America’s billionaire entrepreneurs give, on average,  US$179.5 million per person to various causes during their lifetimes — more than any other ultra high net worth (UHNW) donor group — according to a new report by Wealth-X and Arton Capital….”

  • Scoring a Mortgage

The Federal Reserve Bank of New York reported “59% of new mortgage originations (by dollar, not by number) in the 3rd quarter of 2015, were obtained by borrowers with credit scores above 780.”

I snooped around and data from  the Statistic Brain Research Group showed, as of July 8, 2014, the national FICO average credit score  was 691.

FICO scores range from  300 to  850.

  • Mergers or let’s just call it “ DuPoints”

The Washington Post’s Drew Harwell wrote a read-worthy piece published December 11, 2015, titled “Dow and DuPont, two of America’s oldest giants, to merge in jaw-dropping mega deal”.

In case you have forgotten what these two iconic companies manufacture, here’s some of what  Harwell wrote:

“Dow was founded in 1897 by chemist Herbert Henry Dow primarily as a seller of bleach, but it would become one of America’s chief suppliers of chemicals for explosives, medicines and tear gas during World War I. With the Monsanto Company, Dow would also produce Agent Orange, the toxic herbicide made infamous during and after the Vietnam War.

“DuPont was founded in 1802 as a gunpowder mill by the French-American industrialist Éleuthère Irénée du Pont. The company would go on to develop neoprene, a synthetic rubber; corian, used in home countertops; mylar, a plastic in balloons; and the refrigerant freon.”

Full story at: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/business/wp/2015/12/11/dow-and-dupont-two-of-americas-oldest-giants-to-merge-in-job-dropping-megadeal/